lab prattle

In recent interactions with a woman, founder of a 508(c)(1)(a) to whom I might eventually consult, she took me up on my offer to prattle on about my virology lab experience.  As her organization deals with consequences of a particular virus, she might be interested in knowing where I’m coming from.   Here’s what I told her:

My CV (1) has a listing of my lab experience (a post-retirement embellishment), but I offered a prattle and you said bring it on, so here goes.  I stumbled through U of M undergrad, finally collecting enough science credits to get pre-med pre-reqs and a Zoology degree in ‘74, doing well enough on MCATs to make it look like I’d have a chance at med school.  Since I didn’t do that in time to enter med school right after graduation, I went to grad school in microbiology.  In the mid 70s, molecular techniques like restriction enzymes were just emerging which would turn virology into such a hot area.  My classroom success didn’t translate to the lab, but I spent time in the lab of up-and-comer Tony Faras working on retroviruses, RNA viruses implicated in cancer.  Maybe my experiments fell flat, but I learned the lingo.  When Tony went back home to Minnesota, I hooked up with Bill Murphy, who was working with slow viruses, like visna and kuru, which cause no symptoms for a long time after they infect, then disaster happens.  At the time they were thought to be implicated in Alzheimer’s.  HIV was a decade away from being discovered, but is now characterized as a slow virus.  Bill recognized my skills so I wrote proposals and did no bench work.   I would have done more with him had I made it into Michigan med school.  Instead, I had to settle for the University of Chicago.  There, I spent 2 semesters and a summer in Elliott Kieff’s lab.  His thing was Epstein-Barr virus, which has never not been interesting, given its role in lymphoma, autoimmune diseases, and even chronic fatigue.  I actually got a few things to work in his lab, tho’ nothing publishable.  For me, lab research was always a means to an end, with scholarships and posts open to those who had put time in the lab.   My tales of research experience impressed those interviewing me when I was seeking an Internal Medicine residency and I matched to an elite place, Barnes Hospital in St. Louis, a Wash U affiliate.  I got my first taste of rheumatology in med school but my experiences at Barnes convinced me that was where I belonged.  I may have overrated my assets as I sought a fellowship, as of Hopkins, UCSF, Barnes, and Michigan, only my home institution offered me a position.  That was fine with me as I enjoyed coming home, had a great fellowship experience, and a long satisfying career on faculty.  Research was expected of fellows, and Michigan had a unique young hotshot who was a virologist, Tom Schnitzer.  He was working with a reovirus that caused muscle inflammation, similar to what happens in the rare but important autoimmune disease polymyositis.  Again, I stumbled in the lab, but enjoyed other benefits, not the least of which was meeting my wife-to-be, then a PhD student with whom I was going to collaborate.  Plus, I’m sure I would not have been offered a job had I not done bench research.

I never returned to bench research, but realized that those who succeed there are a different breed.  Good for them.  But I’ve kept my interest in viruses and really enjoyed dusting off those chops starting in December ’19 when Mr. Corona first raised his spikey head.  I started blogging the next month and many of those posts were about coronavirus.  By June of ’21, I’d written enough to fill a book https://www.amazon.com/Musing-through-Pandemic-Year-Corona/dp/B098GV14KY/ref=sr_1_4?crid=28SWTSTDEQ2ZN&keywords=%22Robert+Ike%22&qid=1664631812&sprefix=robert+ike+%2Caps%2C107&sr=8-4

Worth the 10 bucks (or $3 Kindle) if only to read “Fauci’s feeble-minded fear-filled followers”, inspired by an encounter with one of those in the woods.

You can check out my Amazon author page to see what else I’ve published https://www.amazon.com/Robert-Ike/e/B095CPDZGP?ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_2&qid=1664631980&sr=8-2

Well, that’s more than enough for now.  I look forward to talking with you next month.

References

  1.  Ike B.  My C.V. (updated). WordPress 10/1/22.  https://theviewfromharbal.com/2022/10/01/my-c-v-updated/

my C.V. (updated)

This was a snoozer in November ’20 and it still is. But it helps me to have an accessible version of my current curriculum vitae, so here ot is:

Robert William Ike

Emeritus Associate Professor of Medicine

Division of Rheumatology

University of Michigan

Docere, L.L.C.

1611 Harbal Drive

Ann Arbor, MI  48105-1815

(734) 474-6728

rike@umich.edu

scopydoc52@yahoo.com

ORCiD ID https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4715-4384

Web of Science Researcher ID AAC-3582-2021

Education and Training

9/1966-6/1970                       Diploma, Vicksburg Community High School, Vicksburg, Michigan (salutatorian)

9/1970-6/1974                       B.S., Zoology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

9/1974-6/1975                       M.S., Microbiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

9/1975-6/1979                       M.D., University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine

7/1979-6/1980                       Intern, Barnes Hospital Group, St. Louis, Missouri

7/1980-6/1982                       Resident, Barnes Hospital Group (Internal Medicine), St. Louis,

Missouri

7/1983-6/1985                       Fellow, University of Michigan Hospitals (Division of Rheumatology and Rackham Arthritis Research Unit), Ann Arbor, Michigan

7/1985-6/1986                       Visiting Fellow, Augustana Hospital and Lutheran General Hospital (Rheumatology and Arthroscopic Surgery), Chicago and Park Ridge, Illinois

Certification and Licensure

1980                            Diplomat, National Board of Medical Examiners

1980-1984                  Missouri Medical Licensure R8A71

1981-present              Michigan Medical Licensure 4301045530

1982-1986                  Illinois Medical Licensure 036-071129

2016-2018                  California Medical Licensure G145672

1983-present              Board Certified in Internal Medicine 089407

1986-present              Board Certified in Rheumatology

Academic, Administrative, and Clinical Appointments

1/1975-8/1975           Teaching Assistant, Department of Microbiology, University of

Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan

7/1979-6/1982           Assistant in Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St.

Louis, Missouri

7/1982-6/1983           Staff Physician, DePaul Hospital, St. Charles, Missouri and Christian

Hospitals, Florissant, Missouri

7/1985-8/1991           Instructor, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of

Rheumatology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

7/1985-present           Staff Physician, University of Michigan Hospital, Ann Arbor, Michigan

7/1985-present           Staff Physician, Veteran’s Administration Medical Center, Ann Arbor,

Michigan

9/1991-8/1994           Assistant Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of

Rheumatology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

9/1994-6/2019           Associate Professor (with tenure), Department of Internal Medicine,

                                    Division of Rheumatology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor,

                                    Michigan

1/2017-7/2019           Voluntary Clinical Professor, Department of Medicine, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California

7/2019-present           Emeritus Associate Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor,

                                    Michigan

Research Interests

  1. Psoriatic arthritis
  2. Musculoskeletal ultrasound
  3. Teaching of invasive procedures

Lab experience

lab of Anthony J. Faras, University of Michigan (retroviruses) 9/74- 5/75

lab of William D. Murphy, University of Michigan (slow viruses) 6/75 – 8/75

lab of Elliott D. Kieff, University of Chicago (Epstein Barr viruses) 4/76 – 8/76

lab of Thomas D. Schnitzer, University of Michigan (myotropic reoviruses)  9/83 -5/84

Grants

Past Grants:

Sponsor:                              Center for Research in Learning and Training (CRLT)

Title:                                     Video assisted instruction and demonstration of labial salivary gland biopsy

   PI:                                         Robert Ike, MD

Period:                                 5/6/2017- 5/31/2018

Role:                                     PI (0% FTE)                 

Total direct costs:                $500

Sponsor:                               Janssen Research and Development

Title:                                     A Phase 3, Multi-Center, Randomized, Double-Blind Placebo-controlled Study evaluating the efficacy and safety of Guseklumab administered subcutaneously in subjects with Active Psoriatic Arthritis

Period:                                 10/11/2017 -09/30/2022

Role:                                     Co-I with effort

Total direct costs:                $266,181

Sponsor:                                  Janssen Research and Development

Title:                                     A Phase 3, Multi-Center, Randomized, Double-Blind Placebo-controlled Study evaluating the efficacy and safety of Guseklumab administered subcutaneously in subjects with Active Psoriatic Arthritis including those previously treated with Biologic Anti-TNF Agents

Period:                                    10/1/2017 – 09/30//2020

Role:                                        Co-I with effort

Total direct costs:                   $254,322

Sponsor:                                  Idera Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Title:                                        A Phase 2 Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of IMO-8400 in patients with Dermatomyositis

PI:                                            Elena Schiopu, MD

Period:                                    02/01/2016 – 01/01/2018

Role:                                        Co-I without Effort

Total direct costs:                   $428.883

Sponsor:                                  Idera Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Title:                                        A Phase 2 Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of IMO-8400 in patients with Dermatomyositis

PI:                                            Elena Schiopu, MD

Period:                                    02/01/2016 – 01/01/2018

Role:                                        Co-I without Effort

Total direct costs:                   $5,162

Sponsor:                                  Idera Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Title:                                        A Phase 2 Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of IMO-8400 in patients with Dermatomyositis

PI:                                            Elena Schiopu, MD

Period:                                    02/01/2016 – 01/01/2018

Role:                                        Co-I without Effort

Total direct costs:                   $13,986

Sponsor:                                  Idera Pharmaceuticals through Parexel International

Title:                                        A Phase 2, Randomized, Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial of IMO-8400 in Patients with Dermatomyositis  

PI:                                            Schiopu, Elena, MD

Period:                                    02/01/2016 – 01/31/2018

Role:                                        Co-I without effort

Total direct costs:                   $428,811        

Sponsor:                                  Hoffmann-Laroche through PRA Health Sciences

Title:                                        A Multi-Center, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Parallel Group Phase 2A study to Assess the Efficacy of RO5459072 in Patients with Primary Sjogren’s Syndrome

PI:                                            Schiopu, Elena, MD

Period:                                    09/26/16 – 08/31/2018

Role:                                        Co-I without effort

Total direct costs:                   $217,566

Sponsor:                                  SubK-NIH-DHHS-US through a consortium with Northwestern University

Title:                                        Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial tissue Network (REASON)

PI:                                            Perlman, H, Ph.D.

Period:                                    09/01/2014 – 09/30/2019

Role:                                        Co-I with effort

Total direct costs:                   $683,585

Sponsor:                                  NIH (UH2AR067881-03) Subaward through Northwestern University 

Title:                                        AMP (REASON) Evolving Adaptive Mechanisms in pre RA Through Established Disease

PI:                                            Fox, David A., MD

Period:                                    09/26/2014 – 05/31/2017

Role:                                        Co-I with effort

Total direct costs:                   $48,477

Sponsor:                                 Medimmune Ext (CP 212)

Title:                                        A Phase 2 Open-label Study to Evaluate the Long-term Safety of Sifalimumab in Adult Subjects with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus or Myositis

PI:                                            Elena Schiopu, MD

Period:                                     12/16/2010-12/31/2015

Role:                                        Co-Investigator (0% FTE)                   

Total direct costs:                   $182,773

Sponsor:                                  NIH (2R01AR050511 06A1)

Title:                                        Identification of Psoriatic Arthritis Genes

PI:                                            JT Elder, MD

Period:                                     9/28/2009- 7/31/2014

Role:                                        Co-Investigator (10% FTE)

Total Direct Costs:                   $3,227,822.00

Sponsor:                                  Medimmune 545 (CP 151)

Title:                                        Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Study to Evaluate Safety of Multiple-Dose, Intravenously Administered Medi-545, a Fully Human Anti-Interferon-Alpha Monoclonal Antibody in Adult Patients with Dermatomyositis

PI:                                            Elena Schiopu, MD

Period:                                    5/1/08-5/31/11

Role:                                        Co-Investigator (3% FTE)

Total direct costs:                   $193,913

Sponsor:                                 Medimmune 546 (CP 180)

Title:                                        Single and Multiple Intravenous Doses of MEDI-546, a Fully Human Monoclonal Antibody Directed Against Subunit 1 of the Type I Interferon Receptor, in Adult Subjects with Scleroderma

PI:                                            Elena Schiopu, MD

Period;                                    8/1/09-7/31/12

Role:                                        Co-Investigator (0% FTE)

Total direct costs:                   $152,081

Sponsor:                                  Medimmune 551 (CP 200)

Title:                                        A Phase 1, Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Study of the Safety and Tolerability of MEDI-551 in Scleroderma

PI:                                            Elena Schiopu, MD

Period:                                    3/22/2010-1/31/2012

Role:                                        Co-Investigator (0% FTE)

Total direct costs:                   $109,879

Sponsor:                                  NIH – Subcontracts to University of Pittsburgh (RO1 AR-4-2273)

Title:                                        Rituximab in the Treatment of Refractory Adult and Juvenile

Dermatomyositis (DM) and Adult Polymyositis (PM)

PI:                                            James Seibold, MD

Period:                                    5/15/06 – 9/29/09

Role:                                        Co-Investigator

Total Direct Costs:                  $200,757

Sponsor:                                  NIH (R01 AR050511-01)

Title:                                        Identification of a Psoriatic Arthritis Gene in MHC

PI:                                            JT Elder, MD

Period:                                     4/5/04 – 3/31/09

Role:                                        Co-Investigator (10% FTE)

Total Direct Costs:                   $875,000

Sponsor:                                 UM General Clinical Research Center

Title:                                        Genetic Analysis of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis

PI:                                            JT Elder, MD

Period:                                     3/1/05 – 2/28/09

Role:                                        Co-Investigator (no salary support)

Total Direct Costs:                   $93,250

Sponsor:                                  NIH – Subcontracts to University of Minnesota

(SBIR2 43AR049637-01A1)

Title:                                        Evaluation and Development of Virtual Reality-based Joint

Injection Simulator

PI:                                            M Mahowald, MD

Period:                                    11/1/06 – 10/31/08

Role:                                        Consultant

Total Direct Costs:                  $750,000

Sponsor:                                  Centocor (C0743T10)

Title:                                        A phase 2, multicenter, randomized, double blind, placebo

controlled trial of CNTO 1275, a fully humanized human anti-IL-

12 monoclonal antibody administered subcutaneously, in subjects

with psoriatic arthritis

PI:                                            Yolanda Helfrich, MD

Period:                                    8/1/06-4/30/08

Role:                                        Co-Investigator

Total Direct Costs:                  $69,112

Major Previous Grants:

Sponsor:                                  ACR Clinical Scholar Educator Award

Title:                                        Rheumatology as a contact sport

PI:                                            Robert Ike, M.D.

Period:                                    7/1/02 – 6/30/05

Role:                                        Primary Investigator (35% FTE)

Total Direct Costs:                   $150,000

Honors and Awards

1970                            Certificate of Recognition.  State of Michigan Competitive Scholarship Program

1970                            National Merit Scholar

1970                            Regents-Alumni Scholar, University of Michigan

1970-1974                  Honors College, College of Literature Science and the Arts, University                                of Michigan

1971-1974                  Class Honors, University of Michigan

1974                            Graduation with High Distinction, University of Michigan

1976                            Medical Student Research Award

1979                            Kraft Pre-Doctoral Fellowship in Clinical Nutrition

1996                            Mentor to Joshua Friedman, M.D., recipient of National Sjögren’s

                                    Syndrome Association Award

1996                            Mentor to Mariana Kaplan, M.D., recipient of Ethel Baxter-Sjögren’s

                                    Syndrome Foundation Award for Excellence in Research

2002                            Clinical Scholar Educator Award, American College of Rheumatology

2005                            Mentor to Kevin Kia, recipient of 2005-2006 ACR Research and

                                    Education Foundation Medical/Graduate Student Achievement Award

2021                            University of Michigan Alumni Association Influencer Badge

Memberships in Professional Societies

1987-1989      Arthritis Foundation (Michigan Chapter)

1995-1998      Central Society for Clinical Research

1987-present  Michigan Rheumatism Society

1988-present  American College of Rheumatology, Fellow

2007-               Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis

2007-               Ultrasound School of North American Rheumatologists (USSONAR)

2020-               Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI), Emeritus Member

2021                American Association of Physicians and Surgeons

Editorial Positions, Boards, and Peer-Review Service

Manuscript Reviewer:

1990-present  Arthritis and Rheumatism

1995-present  Osteoarthritis and Cartilage

2005-present  Journal of Rheumatology

2008-present  Journal of Clinical Rheumatology

2009                American journal of physical medicine & rehabilitation

2009                Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology

2010                Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine

2010                Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism

2020                Cartilage

2020                Current Rheumatology Reports

2021                Journal of International Medical Research

2021                International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation.

2022                Rheumatology Advances in Practice

Grant Reviewer:

            1990                Veteran’s Administration Merit Review

            1992                The Arthritis Society (Canada)

            1994                University of Connecticut Multipurpose Arthritis Center

Editorial Board:

            2021                The Open Rheumatology Journal

Teaching

7/1986-2004               Attending Physician, Internal Medicine, one month/year

Residents, interns, senior and junior medical students present.

7/1986-11/2018         Rheumatology Clinic, 4 half days/week

Postdoctoral fellows, medical residents, and 3rd year students present.

7/1986-11/2018         Rheumatology consult rounds, two-three months/year

Fellows, residents, and senior students present.

7/1986-6/1988           Coordinator, Musculoskeletal section, Introduction to Clinical Sciences

(ICS 610), University of Michigan

7/1986-6/1988           Medical Student Preceptor, Introduction to Clinical Sciences (ICS 611),

University of Michigan

8/1986                         “Reactive arthritis syndrome following Salmonella gastroenteritis,”

                                    Rackham Arthritis Research Unit (RARU) Lecture Series

8/1986                        “Tidal knee irrigation,” RARU Lecture Series

9/1986                        “Tidal knee irrigation,” VA Grand Rounds

2/1987                        “Reactive arthritis,” Ortho/Rheum Conference

5/12/1987                   “New approaches to the non-surgical management of osteoarthritis,”

                                    Advances in Internal Medicine

6/1987                        “Muscle diseases,” RARU Lecture Series

6/1987                        “Arthroscopy,” RARU Lecture Series

10/1987                      “Osteoarthritis,” RARU Lecture Series

10/1987                      “Rheumatologic disorders in the elderly,” Family Practice Conference

1/1988                        “Scleroderma and its variants,” RARU Lecture Series

1/1988                        “Exercise and bone mass in postmenopausal osteoporosis,” Rheumatology Journal Club

2/1988                        “Rheumatic diseases and the eye,” Ophthalmology Grand Rounds

3/1988                        “Rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis,” Nursing Inservice-6C

5/10/1988                   “Arthroscopy: Who, when, why?” Advances in Internal Medicine

6/1988                        “Polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and scleroderma,” Nursing Inservice-6C

10/1988                      “Rheumatologic arthroscopy: A new look,” Internal Medicine Grand

                                    Rounds

10/1988                      “Tidal irrigation in septic arthritis,” Rheumatology New Therapies

                                    Conference

12/1988                      “The spondyloarthropathies,” RARU Lecture Series

3/18/1989                   “Joint aspiration and injection techniques,” Family Practice Update

4/1989                        “Primary Sjögren’s syndrome,” RARU Lecture Series

5/16/1989                   “Interventional rheumatology,” Advances in Internal Medicine

7/1989                        “Anatomy and physical examination of the musculoskeletal system,”

                                    RARU Lecture Series

7/1989-6/1991           Preceptor, Musculoskeletal section, Introduction to Clinical Sciences (ICS 610), University of Michigan

8/1989                        “Spondyloarthropathies,” RARU Lecture Series

8/1989                        “Arthritis overview for nurses,” Taubman Outpatient Nurses Inservice

12/1989                      “Rheumatologic disorders in the elderly,” Family Practice Conference

12/1989                      “Sjögren’s syndrome,” RARU Lecture Series

1/1990                        “Reiter’s syndrome,” RARU Lecture Series

3/22/1990                   “Joint aspiration and injection techniques,” Family Practice Update

4/1990                        “Ankylosing spondylitis,” Ortho/Rheum Conference

4/1990                        “CPC: An elderly man with weakness and weight loss,” Ortho/Rheum

                                    Conference

5/8/1990                     “Arthroscopy in knee arthritis,” Advances in Internal Medicine

7/1990                        “Biology, examination and injection of the joints,” RARU Lecture Series

7/1990-6/1992           Introduction to Clinical Sciences (ICS 611), Lecturer, University of

Michigan

8/1990                        “Arthroscopy,” RARU Lecture Series

8/1990                        “The Spondyloarthropathies,” RARU Lecture Series

10/19/1990                 “Rheumatologic arthroscopy: A new look at joint disorders,” William

                                    D. Robinson Society

12/1990                      “Rheumatologic disorders in the elderly,” Family Practice Conference

4/10/1991                   “Joint injections: A video presentation,” Advances in Internal Medicine

5/1991                        “CPC,” RARU Lecture Series

7/1991                        “Anatomy and physical exam of the musculoskeletal system/joint and soft tissue injections,” RARU Lecture Series

10/19-10/20/1991      “Office-based arthroscopy for rheumatologists,” American College of

Rheumatology Sponsored Pilot Course, Course Faculty, Chicago, IL

12/1991                      “Rheumatologic disorders in the elderly,” Family Practice Conference

4/30/1992                   “Arthroscopy in the diagnosis and management of rheumatologic

                                    diseases,” Advances in Internal Medicine

5/20/1992                   “Diagnosis approaches to arthritis – Use of arthroscopy,” New Diagnostic Approaches to the Rheumatic Diseases

6/22-6/26/1992          “Arthritis update: Osteo-, rheumatoid, and then some,” Northern Michigan Summer Conference, Course Faculty, Bellaire, MI

6/22-6/26/1992          “Crystals and arthritis: Gout and beyond,” Northern Michigan Summer

Conference, Course Faculty, Bellaire, MI

6/22-6/26/1992          “Aspiration and injection techniques for joints and soft tissues,” Northern Michigan Summer Conference, Course Faculty, Bellaire, MI

6/22-6/26/1992          “Aching all over,” Northern Michigan Summer Conference, Course

Faculty, Bellaire, MI

6/22-6/26/1992          “The arthritic knee – A practical approach,” Northern Michigan Summer Conference, Course Faculty, Bellaire, MI

6/27-6/28/1992          “Office-based needle arthroscopy,” American College of Rheumatology,

Course Faculty, Chicago, IL

7/25-7/26/1992          “Office-based needle arthroscopy,” American College of Rheumatology, Course Faculty, Philadelphia, PA

7/1992-present           Senior Elective Rotation in Rheumatology, Course Director, University of Michigan

8/29-8/30/1992          “Office-based needle arthroscopy,” American College of Rheumatology, Course Faculty, Palo Alto, CA

10/1992                      “The painful knee,” RARU Lecture Series

10/1992                      “The spondyloarthropathies,” RARU Lecture Series

5/15-16/1993             “Office-based needle arthroscopy,” American College of Rheumatology, Course Faculty, Atlanta, GA

7/1993                        “Introduction to joint anatomy and injection techniques,” RARU Lecture Series

7/24-25/1993             “Office-based needle arthroscopy,” American College of Rheumatology, Course Faculty, Boston, MA

9/1993                        “Seronegative spondylarthritis,” RARU Lecture Series

8/1994                        “Septic arthritis,” RARU Lecture Series

3/9-3/11/1995            1st EULAR/ESCIT Arthroscopy Course, Course Faculty, Karolinska

Institute, Stockholm, Sweden

4/1995                        Course Faculty “Interventional Rheumatology”, Frederick, MD

7/1995                        “Anatomy and examination of joints, part I & II,” RARU Lecture Series

8/1995                        “Anatomy and examination of joints, part III,” RARU Lecture Series

8/1995                        “Infection of joints and bursae,” RARU Lecture Series

9/1995                        “Using the polarizing light microscope,” RARU Lecture Series

9/1995                        “Getting into joints: A video presentation,” RARU Lecture Series

7/1996 July:                 “Utility of medical arthroscopy,” Internal Medicine Grand Rounds

7/1996-5/2018           Rheumatology Pathology Conference, Coordinator, University of

Michigan

9/15-9/17/1996          2nd EULAR/ESCIT Arthroscopy Course, Course Faculty, Karolinska

Institute, Stockholm, Sweden

1/1997                        “Sjögren’s syndrome,” RARU Lecture Series

1/1997                        “Spondyloarthropathies,” RARU Lecture Series

5/1997                        “CPC,” Rheumatology Grand Rounds

6/1997                        “Interventional rheumatology”, Frederick MD, Course faculty

7/1997                        “Practicum on procedures in rheumatology,” RARU Lecture Series

9/1997                        “Infection of joints and bursae,” RARU Lecture Series

7/24/1998                   “Interventional rheumatology”, University of Maryland, Course Faculty, Baltimore, MD

7/1998-6/2002           Rheumatology X-ray Conference, Coordinator, University of Michigan

8/1998                        “Practicum on procedures in rheumatology,” RARU Lecture Series

12/1998                      “Osteoarthritis,” Internal Medicine Grand Rounds

5/14-15/1999             “Interventional rheumatology,” University of Maryland, Course Faculty, Baltimore, MD

6/13-15/1999             4th EULAR Arthroscopy Course, Course Faculty, University of Leeds,

Leeds, UK

9/23/1999                   “Unconventional therapies in arthritis,” Musculoskeletal Diseases in the Elderly, Grand Traverse Resort, Acme MI

10/16/1999                 “High-impact rheumatology,” Course Faculty, Ypsilanti MI

12/11/1999                 “High-impact rheumatology,” Course Faculty, Ypsilanti MI

5/5-6/2000                 “Interventional rheumatology,” University of Maryland, Course Faculty, Baltimore, MD

5/10/2000                   “Medical management of osteoarthritis,” UM-Multipurpose Arthritis

Center Symposium on Osteoarthritis

10/26-27/2000           “Cutting edge diagnostic techniques for the new millennium,” The Joseph Lee Hollander Workshop sponsored by Cooper Health System and Pan American League Against Rheumatism (PANLAR), Course Faculty, Philadelphia, PA

2001                            “Musculoskeletal system exam and injection techniques,” Med HO

Workshop (given in July, August, September, and October)

4/20-21/2001             “Interventional rheumatology,” University of Maryland, Course Faculty, Baltimore, MD

7/2001                        “Examination and injection of joints,” RARU Lecture Series

2001-present              “Workshop on examination and injection of musculoskeletal structures,” ½ day session delivered to Medicine Residents on Outpatient Rotation (given 6 times in 12 month academic cycle

5/2002                        “Musculoskeletal system exam and injection techniques,” Med HO Workshop

5/2002                        “Gizmos, gadgets and goop – or- What’s that in your pocket, Doctor?”

RARU Lecture Series

7/2002                         “Spondyloarthropathy stories: Hinges, hook-ups, and a whole lot more,”

                                    Internal Medicine Noon Conference

8/2002                        “Examination and injection of joints,” RARU Lecture Series

9/2002                        “Joint jubilee,” Med HO Workshop

1/2003                        “Differential diagnosis of ‘septic’ arthritis (pyarthrosis),” Rheumatology

Grand Rounds

6/2003                        “Joint jubilee,” Med HO Workshop

7/2003                        “Anatomy, examination & injection of joints, parts I & II,” RARU Lecture Series

7/2004                        “Assessment and differential diagnosis of arthritis,” Orthopedics Lecture Series

7/2004                        “Examination & injection of joints, parts I & II,” RARU Lecture Series

3/2005                        “Joint injection workshop,” Med HO Workshop

4/2005                        “Spondyloarthropathies,” Internal Medicine Grand Rounds

5/2005                        “Joint injection workshop,” Med HO Workshop

7/2005                        “Examination & injection of joints, parts I & II,” RARU Lecture Series

8/2005                        “Joint wrap-up and fearless microscopy,” RARU Lecture Series

8/2005                        “Rheumatologic exam: Assessment and differential diagnosis of arthritis,” Orthopedics Lecture Series

8/2005                        Rheumatology Gross Session I

2005                            “Joint injection workshop,” Med HO Workshop (given in August,

October, and December)

11/14-11/15/2005      “Workshop on joint injection techniques,” American College of

Rheumatology Annual Meeting, Instructor, San Diego, CA

2006                            “Joint injection workshop,” Med HO Workshop (given in February, April, and June)

8/2006                        “Anatomy, examination and injection of joints, parts I & II,”

Rheumatology Core Curriculum Conference

8/2006                        “Synovial fluid analysis and polarizing light microscopy,” Rheumatology

Core Curriculum Conference

8/2006                        Rheumatology Gross Session

7/13-15/07                 Course Faculty, 6th Biennial Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Disease Update Course for the Primary Care Physician.  Lectures: “Aspiration and analysis of synovial fluid”; “Psoriatic arthritis”.  Grand Hotel, Mackinac Island, MI

8/2007                        “Anatomy, examination and injection of joints, parts I, II&III”

Rheumatology Core Curriculum Conference

8/2007                        Rheumatology Gross Session

9/2007                        “Synovial fluid analysis and polarizing light microscopy,” Rheumatology

Core Curriculum Conference

7/2008                        Rheumatology Gross Session

8/2008                        “Anatomy, examination and injection of joints, parts I, II&III”

Rheumatology Core Curriculum Conference

9/2008                        “Synovial fluid analysis and polarizing light microscopy,” Rheumatology

Core Curriculum Conference

2/2009                        “Practice point: how to be a HIPAA violator,” Rheumatology

Core Curriculum Conference

5/21/2009                   “Osteoarthritis”, Orthopedic Resident’s Conference

6/2/2009                     “Ultrasound in rheumatology: what should we expect?”, Rheumatology Core Curriculum Conference

6/3/2009                     “Psoriatic Arthritis”, Dermatology Residents’ Conference

7/2009                        Rheumatology Gross Session

8/2009                        “Anatomy, examination and injection of joints, parts I, II&III”

Rheumatology Core Curriculum Conference

9/2009                        “Synovial fluid analysis and polarizing light microscopy,” Rheumatology

Core Curriculum Conference

3/4-6/10                     Course Faculty, 2nd Winter Rheumatology Update.  Lectures: “Psoriatic Arthritis: Progress in Diagnosis and Management”; “Joint Aspiration and Injection: Utility of the Physical Exam, Synovial Fluid Analysis and Musculoskeletal Ultrasound”.  Captiva Island, FL

5/12/2010                   “Osteoarthritis”, Orthopedic Residents’ Conference

8/2010                        “Anatomy, examination and injection of joints, parts I, II&III”

Rheumatology Core Curriculum Conference

9/2010                        “Synovial fluid analysis and polarizing light microscopy,” Rheumatology Core Curriculum Conference

6/7/2011                     “Osteoarthritis”, Orthopedic Residents’ Conference

7/2011                        Rheumatology Gross Session

8/2011                        “Anatomy, examination and injection of joints, parts I, II&III”

Rheumatology Core Curriculum Conference

9/2011                        “Synovial fluid analysis and polarizing light microscopy,” Rheumatology Core Curriculum Conference

3/28/12                       “Approach to the patient with muscle weakness”, Orthopedic Residents’ Conference

7/2012                        Rheumatology Gross Session

8/2012                        “Anatomy, examination and injection of joints, parts I, II&III”

Rheumatology Core Curriculum Conference

9/2012                        “Synovial fluid analysis and polarizing light microscopy,” Rheumatology Core Curriculum Conference

9/2013                        “Anatomy, examination and injection of joints, parts I, II&III”

Rheumatology Core Curriculum Conference

9/2013                        “Synovial fluid analysis and polarizing light microscopy,” Rheumatology Core Curriculum Conference

7/2014                        Rheumatology Gross Session

9-9/2014                     “Anatomy, examination and injection of joints, parts I, II&III”

Rheumatology Core Curriculum Conference

9/2014                        “Synovial fluid analysis and polarizing light microscopy,” Rheumatology Core Curriculum Conference

8/2015                        “Anatomy, examination and injection of joints, parts I, II&III” Rheumatology Core Curriculum Conference

 8/2016                       “Anatomy, examination and injection of joints, parts I, II&III”

Rheumatology Core Curriculum Conference

9/2016                        “Synovial fluid analysis and polarizing light microscopy,” Rheumatology Core Curriculum Conference

8/2017                        “Anatomy, examination and injection of joints, parts I, II&III” Rheumatology Core Curriculum Conference

 9/2017                       “Synovial fluid analysis and polarizing light microscopy,” Rheumatology Core Curriculum Conference

8/2018                        “Joint injections” Rheumatology Core Curriculum Conference

9/2018                        “Synovial fluid analysis” Rheumatology Core Curriculum Conference

12/2020                      “Synovial fluid analysis and polarizing light microscopy” Rheumatology Grand Rounds

3/2022                        “Synovial fluid analysis and polarizing light microscopy,” Rheumatology Core Curriculum Conference

Committee, Organizational, and Volunteer Service

Institutional

1984-1987                  Division Liaison, University of Michigan Medsport Program

1986                            Member, Multispecialty Committee on Osteoporosis Program

                                    Development

1986-1990                  Member, Steering Committee: Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Team

1986-1987                  Member, Postgraduate Training Committee: Rheumatology Division

1986-1987                  Member, Computer Simulation Study Group: Introduction to Clinical

                                    Sciences

1986-1987                  Member, Operating Committee: Education/Community/Health Services Research Division, University of Michigan Multipurpose Arthritis Center

1986-1988                  Director, Rheumatology Inpatient Services

1988-11/2018             Director, Rheumatology Consultation Services

1989-1991                  Member, Music School/Medical Center Joint Committee on Special Needs of Performing Artists

1991-11/2018             Director, Interventional Rheumatology Programs

1992-1998                  Member, University of Michigan Hospitals Operating Room, Post-

                                    Anesthesia Care Unit, and Delivery Room Committee

1993-1994                  Member, Department of Internal Medicine Clinical Information      Services Steering Committee

1994-1995                  Member, Department of Internal Medicine House Officer Education and

                                    Curriculum Committee

2005-11/2018             Member, Committee for Coordination of Rackham Arthritis Research Unit

(RARU) Conference Series

2007-11/2018             Member, Division of Rheumatology Peer Review Committee

2009-11/2018             Member, Division of Rheumatology Fellowship Oversight Committee

2016-11/2018             Member, CORE (Coordinating Optimal Referral Experiences) Committee

4/2020-                       Member, Medical Procedures Unit Ramp Up Committeee Resumption

Regional

1987-1989                  Member, Arthritis Foundation (Michigan Chapter) Professional Education

Committee

1988-1990                  Secretary Treasurer, Michigan Rheumatism Society

1991-1992                  Vice President, Michigan Rheumatism Society

1993-1994                  President, Michigan Rheumatism Society

1994-1996                  Acting Secretary Treasurer, Michigan Rheumatism Society

National

1987-1990                  Member, American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Subcommittee on

                                    the Classification of Osteoarthritis

1991-1993                  Member, ACR Educational Materials Committee

1992-1994                  Chair, ACR Special Committee for Arthroscopy Data Standards

1992-1993                  Member, ACR Special Committee for Clinical Trials in Arthroscopy

1993-1994                  Chair, ACR Arthroscopy Study Group

1993-1995                  Member, ACR Specialty Programs Subcommittee

5/26-5/27/1996          Chair, Working Group on Direct Visualization of Cartilage, Osteoarthritis Clinical Trials Workshop, sponsored by OARS and the International League Against Rheumatism (ILAR), Washington, DC

2008                            Member, American College of Rheumatology CARE 2009 Development Group

2010                             Chair, American College of Rheumatology Task Force on Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

2011                            Member, American College of Rheumatology Musculoskeletal Ultrasound appropriateness criteria development project: Task Force Panel

International

1993-2003                  Member, International League Against Rheumatism (ILAR) ClinicalTrials

                                    Working Party on Synovial Biopsy

Consulting Positions

1983                            Member, Professional Advisory Board, Beverly Home Health Care

Services, St. Louis, MO

1986-90                       Rheumatology Consultant, Chelsea Family Practice Center, Chelsea, MI

1986-2018                  Consulting Staff, Veteran’s Administration Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI

1990                            Consultant, Hospital Products Division, Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL

  • Consultant, Visionary BioMedical, Inc., Roswell, GA

2008-                           Consultant, Michigan Blue Care Network

Community

1967-75, 2021-           Member, Vicksburg (MI) United Methodist Church

1971-                           Member, Ann Arbor Peoples Co-op

2006-2021                  Member, Ann Arbor (MI) Christian Reformed Church

2019-                           Supporting Member, Chicago Architectural Center

2019-                           Member, University of Michigan Alumni Association

2019-                           Member, University of Michigan Club, Ann Arbor

2020-                           Supporting Member, Frank Lloyd Wright Society

2021-                           Chair, Organizing Committee for Reunions of Vicksburg High School class of 1970

Visiting Professorships, Seminars, and Extramural Invited Presentations

9/13-9/14/1986          “Reactive arthritis following Salmonella gastroenteritis: Follow-up of the Chicago epidemic,” Prairie Rheumatism Club, Invited Speaker, Racine, WI

9/13-9/14/1986          “Tidal knee irrigation,” Prairie Rheumatism Club, Invited Speaker,

Racine, WI

5/13/1987                   “Arthritis and all that,” Medical Town Forum (lay group), Invited Speaker, Tecumseh, MI

8/18/1987                   “Osteoarthritis,” Housestaff Noon Conference, Riverside Osteopathic

Hospital, Invited Speaker, Trenton, MI

9/24/1987                   “Common arthritis problems,” Grand Rounds, Bixby Hospital, Invited

Speaker, Adrian, MI

10/13/1987                 “The Spondyloarthropathies,” Grand Rounds, Pontiac General Hospital,

Invited Speaker, Pontiac, MI

11/11/1987                 “Temporal arteritis,” Medical Grand Rounds, Borgess Hospital, Invited

Speaker, Kalamazoo, MI

5/18/1988                   “Joint injection techniques,” Office Procedures Update for Family

Practitioners, Invited Speaker, Dearborn, MI

10/20/1988                 “Mechanisms of joint damage in arthritis,” Basic Science Conference, St. Joseph’s Hospital, Invited Speaker, Pontiac, MI

11/10/1988                 “Interventional rheumatology,” Medical Grand Rounds, St. Joseph’s

Hospital, Invited Speaker, Ypsilanti, MI

3/1/1989                     “Arthroscopy: who, when, why?” Noon Conference, Flint Osteopathic

Hospital, Invited Speaker, Flint, MI

9/18/1989                   “Rheumatologic arthroscopy,” Rheumatology Grand Rounds, Hines VA – Loyola, Invited Speaker, Hines, IL

9/23/1989                   “Professor in action (CPC),” American College of Physicians Regional

Meeting, Invited Presentation, Traverse City, MI

2/17/1990                   “Osteoporosis prevention: Non-pharmacologic strategies,” Annual

Meeting, Michigan Pharmacist’s Association, Invited Speaker, Dearborn, MI

2/20/1990                   “The painful knee,” Medicine Noon Conference, Hurley Hospital, Invited Speaker, Flint, MI

5/2/1990                     “The ANA is positive – now what?” Medical Grand Rounds, Borgess

Hospital, Invited Speaker, Kalamazoo, MI

7/25/1990                   “Knee arthritis: A rheumatologist’s perspective,” Medical Grand Rounds, William Beaumont Hospital, Invited Speaker, Royal Oak, MI

8/20/1990                   “Knee arthritis: a practical approach,” Grand Rounds, Annapolis Hospital, Invited Speaker, Wayne, MI

9/19/1990                   “Knee arthritis:  A rheumatologist’s perspective,” Lewanee County

Medical Society, Invited Speaker, Tecumseh, MI

10/21/1990                 “New trends in the management of osteoarthritis,” Rheumatology Update, Presbyterian Hospital, UT-Southwestern, Invited Speaker, Dallas, TX

11/6/1990                   “The knee,” Grand Rounds, McPherson Hospital, Invited Speaker,

Howell, MI

11/7/1990                   “Knee arthritis:  A rheumatologist’s perspective,” Grand Rounds, Beyer Hospital, Invited Speaker, Ypsilanti, MI

2/5/1991                     “Knee arthritis,” Staff Conference, Trenton Community Hospital, Invited Speaker, Trenton, MI

2/13/1991                   “New trends in the management of osteoarthritis,” Grand Rounds, St.

Mary’s Hospital, Invited Speaker, Livonia, MI

3/4/1991                     “New trends in the management of osteoarthritis,” Annual Meeting,

Monroe County Medical Society, Invited Speaker, Monroe, MI

9/24/1991                   “Trends in the therapy of osteoarthritis,” Lenawee County Medical

Society, Invited Speaker, Adrian, MI

1/21/1992                   “Arthroscopy in rheumatology,” Rheumatology Grand Rounds, Hutzel

Hospital – Wayne State U, Invited Speaker, Detroit, MI

4/28-4/29/1993          “Utility of joint lavage in arthritis,” Cleveland Review of Rheumatic

Diseases, Invited Speaker, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH

4/28-4/29/1993          “Minor salivary gland biopsy,” Cleveland Review of Rheumatic Diseases, Invited Speaker, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH

1/4/1994                     “Arthroscopy in rheumatology: a tool in search of a job,” University of

Texas – Houston Division of Rheumatology, Visiting Professor, Houston,

TX

4/26-4/27/1994          “The standardization of methods for the assessment of articular cartilage changes in osteoarthritis of the knee and hip joint,” World Health Organization Satellite Workshop, Invited Participant, Monterey, CA

12/11/1994                 Osteoarthritis Research Society (OARS) Workshop on Arthroscopic

Asessment of Articular Cartilage, Invited Speaker and Participant,

Orlando, FL

4/1/1995                     “Knee pain,” Central Regional Meeting of the American College of

Rheumatology, Invited Speaker, Chicago, IL

5/18/1995                   “Interventional Rheumatology,” Grand Rounds, Hurley Medical Center,

Invited Speaker, Flint, MI

6/16/1995                   “The state of the art of synovial biopsies in rheumatoid arthritis: Focus

                                    on macroscopic grading systems,” 3rd International Workshop on

                                    Synovitis, Invited Presentation, Noordwijkhout, The Netherlands

6/21/1995                   “Arthroscopy: An outcome measure of synovitis?” 13th European

                                    Congress of Rheumatology, Invited Presentation, Amsterdam, The

                                    Netherlands

11/15/1995                 “Arthroscopy in rheumatology: A 10-year perspective,” Chicago

Rheumatism Society, Invited Speaker, Chicago, IL

7/3/1996                     “Needle arthroscopy,” Grand Rounds, St. Mary’s Hospital, Invited

Speaker, Livonia, MI

5/1997                        “Arthroscopic assessment of inflammatory synovitis,” RA SCOR

                                    Investigators Meeting

6/10/1997                   “Arthroscopy in rheumatology,” 12th Congress of the International

                                    League Against Rheumatism, Invited Presentation, Singapore        

9/25/1999                   “Evidence-based rheumatology,” American College of Physicians

Regional Meeting, Panelist, Traverse City, MI

11/1999                      “Practical approach to common knee problems,” (w/ Marion Minor, PhD), Combined ACR/AHRP Symposium, ACR Annual Meeting, Invited

Speaker, Boston, MA

5/20/2000                   “Invasive rheumatology: Dead or alive?” Texas Rheumatism Association, Invited Speaker, Galveston, TX

10/9/2002                   “Knee pain stories,” Arthritis Grand Rounds, Michigan Arthritis Foundation/Michigan Center for Rural Health, Invited Speaker, Ann Arbor, MI

4/9/2003                     “Assessment of osteoarthritis,” Arthritis Grand Rounds, Michigan Arthritis Foundation/Michigan Center for Rural Health, Invited Speaker, Ann Arbor, MI

11/2004                      “Osteoarthritis update,” Arthritis Grand Rounds, Michigan Arthritis Foundation/Michigan Center for Rural Health, Invited Speaker, Ann Arbor, MI

11/9/2005                   “Spondyloarthropathies,” Arthritis Grand Rounds, Michigan Arthritis Foundation/Michigan Center for Rural Health, Invited Speaker, Ann Arbor, MI

12/12/2007                 “Psoriatic arthritis,” Arthritis Grand Rounds, Michigan Arthritis Foundation/Michigan Center for Rural Health, Invited Speaker, Ann Arbor, MI

10/8/08                       “Aspiration and analysis of synovial fluid”, Arthritis Grand Rounds, Michigan Arthritis Foundation/Michigan Center for Rural Health, Invited Speaker, Ann Arbor, MI

4/8/09                         “Psoriatic arthritis”, Arthritis Grand Rounds, Michigan Arthritis Foundation/Michigan Center for Rural Health, Invited Speaker, Ann Arbor, MI

10/29/09                     “Ultrasound in rheumatology: what can we expect?”, Michigan Rheumatism Society Fall Meeting, Novi, MI

3/27/10                       “Ultrasound white paper review”, 2010 Rheumatology Program Directors’ Conference, Chicago, IL

11/17/10                     “Muscle disorders in rheumatic diseases”, Arthritis Grand Rounds, Michigan Arthritis Foundation/Michigan Center for Rural Health, Invited Speaker, Ann Arbor, MI

11/12/18                     “Workshop on Minor Salivary Gland Biopsy”, American College of Rheumatology Annual Meeting, co-Director with Sara McCoy, M.D., Atlanta GA.  Mentioned in Bernstein S.  Intensive personalized learning.  Workshops: refine skills. The Rheumatologist: September 2019:  https://www.the-rheumatologist.org/article/intensive-personalized-learning/.

Bibliography

Peer-Reviewed Journals and Publications (*Ike first or senior author)

*1.       Fudman EJ, Golbus JM, Ike RW.  Scleromyxedema with systemic involvement mimics rheumatic disease.  Arthritis Rheum 1986;29:913-917.  doi: 10.1002/art.1780290716

*2.       Trenker SW, Braunstein EM, Lynn MD, Ike RW.  Group G streptococcal arthritis and bowel disease; A rare enteric arthropathy.  Gastrointest Radiol 1987;12:265-267.  doi: 10.1007/BF01885157.

3.         Palchik NS, Wolf FM, Cassidy JT, Ike RW, Davis WK.  Case differences in the problem solving strategies of medical students and physicians.  Res Med Educ 1988;27:248-253.

4.         Palchik NS, Wolf FM, Cassidy JT, Ike RW, Davis WK.  Comparing information‑gathering strategies of medical students and physicians in diagnosing simulated medical cases.  Acad Med 1990;65:107-113.  doi: 10.1097/00001888-199002000-00012.

5.         Altman RD, Block DA, Brandt KD, Cooke DV, Greenwald RA, Hochberg MC, Howell DS,  Ike RW, Kaplan D, Koopman W, Medsger TA, Ramsey-Goldman R.  Osteoarthritis: definitions and criteria.  Ann Rheum Dis 1990;49: 201.  doi: 10.1136/ard.49.3.201-a.

*6.       Matteson EL, Ike RW.  Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia and Sjogren’s syndrome.  J Rheumatol 1990;17:676-679.

*7.       Ike RW.  Septic arthritis due to group C streptococcus.  Report and review of the l iterature.  J Rheumatol 1990;17:1230-1236.

8.         Altman R, Appelrouth D, Alarcon G…Ike R (14/27)…Wolfe F.  [I am the Principal Investigator of a cooperating site.]  Criteria for classification and reporting of osteoarthritis of the hand. Arthritis Rheum 1990;33:1601-1610.  doi: 10.1002/art.1780331101

*9.       Verbrugge LM, Gates DM, Ike RW.  Risk factors for disability among U.S. adults with arthritis. J Clin Epidemiol 1991;44:167-182. doi: 10.1016/0895-4356(91)90264-a.

10.       Altman R, Alarcon G, Appelrouth D…Ike R (13/24)…Wolfe F.  [I am the Principal Investigator of a cooperating site.]  Criteria for classification and reporting of osteoarthritis of the hip.  Arthritis Rheum 1991;34:505-514.  doi: 10.1002/art.1780340502.

*11.     Pincus JM, Ike RW.  Norflox or Norflex?  N Engl J Med 1992;326:1030.  doi: 10.1056/NEJM199204093261519.

*12.     Ike RW, Arnold WJ, Rothschild EW, Shaw HL and the Tidal Irrigation Cooperating Group.  Tidal irrigation versus conservative medical management in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: A prospective randomized study.  J Rheumatol 1992;19:772‑779.

*13.     Ike RW, Arnold WJ.  Arthroscopic lavage of osteoarthritic knees.  J Bone Joint Surg [Br] 1992;74-B:788.  doi: 10.1302/0301-620X.74B5.1527141.

*14.     Ike RW, Blaivas M.  Corticosteroid responsive puffy hands and occult vasculitic neuropathy: RS3PE plus?  J Rheumatol 1993;20:205-206.

*15.     Ike RW, Fox DA.  Arthroscopy in rheumatology training programs associated with NIH-multipurpose arthritis centers: Results from a survey of program directors. Arthritis Rheum 1993;35:1329-1331.  doi: 10.1080/00913847.1989.11709710.

*16.     Ike RW, O’Rourke KS.  Detection of intra-articular abnormalities in osteoarthritis of the knee: A pilot study comparing needle arthroscopy with standard arthroscopy.  Arthritis Rheum 1993;36:1353-1363. doi: 10.1002/art.1780361005.

*17.     Friedman AW, Ike RW.  Mycobacterium kansasii septic arthritis in a patient with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.  Arthritis Rheum 1993;36:1631-1632.  doi: 10.1002/art.1780361120.

*18.     Ike RW.  Tidal irrigation in septic arthritis of the knee: A potential alternative to surgical drainage.  J Rheumatol 1993;20:2104-2111.

*19.     O’Rourke KS, Blaivas M, Ike RW.  Utility of needle muscle biopsy in a University rheumatology practice.  J Rheumatol 1994;21:413-424.

*20.     Ike RW.  Arthroscopy in rheumatology: a tool in search of a job.  J Rheumatol 1994;21:1987-1989.  Editorial.

21.       Laing TJ, Ike RW, Griffiths CE, Richardson BC, Grober JS, Keroack BK, Toth MB, Railan D, Cooper KD.  A pilot study of the effect of oral 8-methoxypsoralen and intraarticular ultraviolet light on rheumatoid synovitis.  J Rheumatol 1995;22:29-33.

*22.     Ike RW, O’Rourke KS.  Compartment directed physical exam of the knee can predict articular cartilage abnormalities disclosed by needle arthroscopy.  Arthritis Rheum 1995;38:917-925.  doi: 10.1002/art.1780380707.

23.       Ayral X, Gueguen A, Ike RW, Bonvarlet J-P, Frizziero L, Kalunian K, Moreland LW, Myers S, O’Rourke KS, Roos H, Altman R, Dougados M.  Inter-observer reliability of the arthroscopic quantification of chondropathy of the knee.  Osteoarthritis Cartilage 1998;6:160-166.  doi: 10.1053/joca.1998.0108.

24.       Altman RD, Moskowitz R and the Hyalgan Study Group.  Intraarticular sodium hyaluronate (Hyalgan) in the treatment of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: A randomized clinical trial.  J Rheumatol 1998:25:2203-2212.  [R. Ike – I am a member of the Hyalgan Study Group as the Principal Investigator of a cooperating site.]

25.       Kalunian KC, Concoff AL, Skovron ML, Klashman DJ, Myers S, Ike R, Seeger L, Singh R, Rich E, Heck L, O’Rourke K, Moreland LW.  Visually-guided irrigation in early knee osteoarthritis: A multi-center randomized prospective study. Osteoarthritis Cartilage 2000;8:412-418.  https://doi-org.proxy.lib.umich.edu/10.1053/joca.1999.0316.

26.       Gupta S, Blaivas M, Ike R, Crofford L.  Polymyositis evolving after rhabdomyolysis associated with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors: A report of two cases.  J Clin Rheumatol 2001;7:332-335.  doi: 10.1097/00124743-200110000-00015.

27.       Friedman J, Klepfish A, Miller EB, Ognenovski V, Ike RW, Schattner A.  Agranulocytosis in Sjögren’s syndrome: Two case reports and analysis of 11 additional reported cases.  Seminars Arthritis Rheum 2002;31(5):338-345.  https://doi-org.proxy.lib.umich.edu/10.1053/sarh.2002.31547

*28.     Kaplan MA, Ike RW.  The liver is a common non-exocrine target in primary Sjogren syndrome. A retrospective review.  BMC Gastroenterology 2002;2:21. 

doi: 10.1186/1471-230x-2-21. 

29.       Swartz RD, Crofford LJ, Phan SH, Ike RW, Su LD.  Nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy: A novel cutaneous fibrosing disorder in patients with renal failure.  Am J Med 2003;114(7):563-572.  doi: 10.1016/s0002-9343(03)00085-8.

*30.     Kocheril SV, Blaivas M, Appleton BE, McCune WJ, Ike RW.  Degos’ disease mimicking vasculitis.  Arthritis Care and Research 2004;51(3):498-500.  doi: 10.1002/art.20393.

31.       Sawalha AH, Saint S, Ike R, Bronze MS.  Clinical problem solving. Still consider the source.  N Engl J Med 2005;353(14):1503-1507.   doi: 10.1056/NEJMcps050056.

*32.     Ike RW.  Arthroscopic lavage of the knee with or without corticosteroids versus joint aspiration—which is best?  Nature Clin Pract Rheumatol 2007; 3(6):320-321.  doi: 10.1038/ncprheum0499.

33.       Kia KF, Nair RP, Ike RW, Hiremagalore R, Elder JT, Ellis CN.  Prevalence of antigliadin antibodies in patients with psoriasis is not elevated compared with controls.  Am J Clin Dermatol 2007; 8(5):301-305.  doi: 10.2165/00128071-200708050-00005.

34.       Nair RP, Duffin KC, Helms C, Ding J, Stuart PE, Goldgar D, Gudjonsson JE, Li Y, Tejasvi T, Feng BJ, Ruether A, Schreiber S, Weichenthal M, Gladman D, Rahman P, Schrodi SJ, Prahalad S, Guthery SL, Fischer J, Liao W, Kwok PY, Menter A, Lathrop GM, Wise CA, Begovich AB, Voorhees JJ, Elder JT, Krueger GG, Bowcock AM, Abecasis GR; Collaborative Association Study of Psoriasis (Ike R one of 43 collaborators).  Genome-wide scan reveals association of psoriasis with IL-23 and NF-kappaB pathways.  Nat Genet 2009 Feb;41(2):199-204.  doi: 10.1038/ng.311.

*35.     Ike RW.  Chemical ablation as an alternative to surgery for treatment of persistent prepatellar bursitis.  J Rheumatol 2009;36(7):1360; doi.3899/jrheum.090070.

*36.     Ike RW, Bole GG Jr.  “Pseudoseptic” Arthritis due to acute lipoarthrosis in an SLE patient with osteonecrosis.  Arthritis Rheum (Arthritis Care & Research) 2009;61(8):1130-2; doi.10.1002/art.24693.

37.       Kissin E, Nishio J, Yang M, Backhaus M, Balint P, Bruyn G, Craig-Muller J, D’Agostino M,    Feoktistov A, Goyal J, Iagnocco A, Ike R, Moller I, Naredo E, Pineda C, Schmidt W, Swen N, Tabechian D, Wakefield R, Wells A, Kaeley G.   Self directed learning of basic musculoskeletal ultrasound among rheumatologists in the United States. Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) 2010;62(2):155-160.  doi: 10.1002/acr.20063.

*38.     Ike RW, Somers EC, Arnold EL, Arnold WJ.  Ultrasound of the knee during voluntary quadriceps contraction: a technique for detecting otherwise occult effusions. Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) 2010;62(5):725-729; doi 10.1002/acr.20047.

*39.     Ike R, Arnold E, Arnold W, Craig-Muller J, Kaeley G, McAlindon T, Nazarian L, Reginato A.  Ultrasound in American rheumatology practice.  Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) 2010;62(9):1206-1219. doi: 10.1002/acr.20241.

40.       Stuart PE, Nair RP, Ellinghaus E, Ding J, Tejasvi T, Gudjonsson JE, Li Y, Weidinger S, Eberlein B, Gieger C, Wichmann HE, Kunz M, Ike R, Krueger GG, Bowcock AM, Mrowietz U, Lim HW, Voorhees JJ, Abecasis GR, Weichenthal M, Franke A, Rahman P, Gladman DD, Elder JT.  Genome-wide association analysis identifies three psoriasis susceptibility loci.  Nat Genet 2010;42(11):1000-1004.  doi: 10.1038/ng.693.

41.       Tsoi LC, Spain SL, Knight J, Ellinghaus E, Stuart PE, Capon F, Ding J, Li Y, Tejasvi T, Gudjonsson JE, Kang HM, Allen MH, McManus R, Novelli G, Samuelsson L, Schalkwijk J, Ståhle M, Burden AD, Smith CH, Cork MJ, Estivill X, Bowcock AM, Krueger GG, Weger W, Worthington J, Tazi-Ahnini R, Nestle FO, Hayday A, Hoffmann P, Winkelmann J, Wijmenga C, Langford C, Edkins S, Andrews R, Blackburn H, Strange A, Band G, Pearson RD, Vukcevic D, Spencer CC, Deloukas P, Mrowietz U, Schreiber S, Weidinger S, Koks S, Kingo K, Esko T, Metspalu A, Lim HW, Voorhees JJ, Weichenthal M, Wichmann HE, Chandran V, Rosen CF, Rahman P, Gladman DD, Griffiths CE, Reis A, Kere J; Collaborative Association Study of Psoriasis (CASP); Genetic Analysis of Psoriasis Consortium; Psoriasis Association Genetics Extension; Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2, Nair RP, Franke A, Barker JN, Abecasis GR, Elder JT, Trembath RC (Ike RW one of 27 members of CASP).  Identification of 15 new psoriasis susceptibility loci highlights the role of innate immunity.  Nat Genet 2012 Dec;44(12):1341-8. doi: 10.1038/ng.2467.

42.       Stuart PE, Nair RP, Tsoi LC, Tejasvi T, Das S, Kang HM, Ellinghaus R, Chandran V,  Callis-Duffin K, Ike R, Li Y, Wen X, Enerbäck C,  Gudjonsson JE, Kõks S, Kingo K, Esko T, Mrowietz U, Reis A, Wichmann HE, Gieger C, Hoffmann P,  Nöthen MM, Winkelmann J, Kunz M, Moreta EG, Mease PJ, Ritchlin CT, Bowcock AM, Krueger GG, Lim HW, Weidinger S, Weichenthal M, Voorhees JJ, Rahman P, Gregersen PK, Franke A, Gladman DD, Abecasis GR, Elder JT, Genome-wide association analysis of psoriatic arthritis and cutaneous psoriasis reveals differences in their genetic architecture.  Am J Hum Genet 2015;97(6):816-36 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2015.10.019.

*43.     Ike RW.  Benign subcutaneous emphysema following knee arthroscopy: report and review of the literature.  Ann Orthop Musculoskel Dis 2017; 1(2):1008.

*44.     Ike RW, Kalunian KC.  Arthroscopy in rheumatology: time for a new look?  J Rheumatol 2018;45(3):300-301.  doi: 10.3899/jrheum.170397.

45.       Mandelin A, Homan P, Shaffer A, Cuda C, Dominguez S, Bacalao E, Bridges SL, Bathon J, Atkinson J, Fox D, Matteson E, Buckley C, Pitzalis C, Parks D, Hughes L, Geraldino L, Ike R, Phillips K, Wright K, Filer A, Kelly S, Ruderman E, Morgan V, Abdala-Valencia H, Misharin A, Budinger GRS, Bartom E, Shilatifard A, Peabody T, Pope R, Perlman H, Winter D.  Transcriptional profiling of synovial macrophages using minimally invasive ultrasound-guided synovial biopsies in rheumatoid arthritis.  Arthritis Rheum 2018;70(6):841-854.  https://doi.org/10.1002/art.40453.

*46.     Ike R, Baskaran A, Chao J, Concoff AL, Wu CW, Sun B, MD, Brion PH, Arnold EL, Klashman DJ, FitzGerald J, Kalunian KC.  Prevalence of crystalline disease in knee osteoarthritis: experience from patients undergoing arthroscopic procedures. J Clin Rheumatol 2019;25(1):51-53.  https://doi: 10.1097/RHU.0000000000000744.https://journals.lww.com/jclinrheum/Citation/2019/01000/Prevalence_of_Crystals_in_Knee_Osteoarthritis_.11.aspx

*47.     Moses V, Asirvatham J, McHugh J, Ike R.  Synovial biopsy in the diagnosis of crystal associated arthropathies.  J Clin Rheumatol 2020;26(4):142-6. doi: 10.1097/RHU.0000000000000993.

*48.     Ike RW, Arnold WJ, Kalunian KC.  Arthroscopy in rheumatology: a reminiscence.  J Surg Surg Technol 2020;2(1):27-35.  https://www.jsurgery.com/articles/arthroscopy-in-rheumatology-a-reminiscence.pdf

*49      Ike RW, Arnold WJ, Kalunian KC.  Arthroscopy in rheumatology.  Where have we been?  Where might we go?  Rheumatol (Oxford) 2021;60:518–528.  Epub 2020 Dec 1 https://doi: 10.1093/rheumatology/keaa560.

*50      Ike RW, Kalunian KC, Arnold WJ.  Why not wash out the OA knee?  J Clin Rheumatol 2021;27(2)43-45.  https://doi: 10.1097/RHU.0000000000001672

*51      Ike RW, Kalunian KC.  Arthroscopy in rheumatology. Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 2021;37(5):1364-1365. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2021.02.024

*52      Ike RW.  Make it add up, doc.  Strategies Account Manag 2021;2(4) SIAM.000542.2021 https://crimsonpublishers.com/siam/pdf/SIAM.000542.pdf.

*53      Ike RW, Kalunian KC.  Will rheumatologists ever pick up an arthroscope again?  Int J Rheum Dis 2021;24:1235–1246.  Epub 2021 July 29.  https://doi: 10.1111/1756-185X.14184

*54.     Ike RW.  How to wash out a knee.  J Biomed Res Environ Sci. 2021 Sept 29; 2(9): 846-848. doi: 10.37871/jbres1320, Article ID: JBRES1320, Available at: https://www.jelsciences.com/articles/jbres1320.pdf

*55.     Ike RW.  Elderly onset lupus complicated by Jaccoud’s arthropathy.  J Clin Med Img. 2021; V5(17): 1-2. https://www.clinandmedimages.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/JCMI-v5-1484.pdf

*56.     Ike RW.  Can bedside knee joint washout help treat septic arthritis?  Ann Orthop Rheumatol 2021; 8(1):1097.  Doi:10.47739/otolaryngology.1097.  https://www.jscimedcentral.com/Orthopedics/orthopedics-8-1097.pdf

*57.     Ike RW.  Why would a rheumatologist want to wield an arthroscope?  EC Orthopaedics 2021;12(12):57-62. https://www.ecronicon.com/ecor/pdf/ECOR-12-00883.pdf

*58.     Ike RW.  Who let this flea into my operating room?  Clin Med 2021;3(3):1039 http://www.medtextpublications.com/open-access/who-let-this-flea-in-my-operating-room-960.pdf.  ISSN: 2688-6731

*59      Ike RW, Kalunian KC.  Regarding arthroscopy: can orthopedists and rheumatologists be friends?  J Clin Rheumatol 2021;28:177–181.  doi: 10.1097/RHU.0000000000001802

60.       Altman RD, Ike RW, Hamburger M, McLain DA, Daley MJ, Adamson III, TC.  Missing the Mark? American College of Rheumatology 2019 Guidelines for Intra-articular Hyaluronic Acid Injection and Osteoarthritis Knee Pain.  J Rheumatol August 2022, 49 (8) 958-960; DOI: https://doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.220125

*61.     Ike RW, Kalunian KC.  Is it time to bring back knee washout?  J Rheumatol (accepted 3/14/22).  2022 May 15;jrheum.211132.  J Rheumatol September 2022, 49 (9) DOI: https://doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.211132

*62.     Ike RW, McCoy SM, Kalunian KC.  What bedside skills should the modern rheumatologist possess?  (submitted 9/4/21 to Seminars Arthritis Rheum 9/4/21, rejected 10/25/21)

*63.     Ike RW, McCoy SS.  Labial salivary gland biopsy instructional videos available.  (submitted 9/27/21) (submitted to J Clin Rheum 9/17/21 rejected 9/20/21; submitted to Clin Rheumatol 9/5/21, rejected 9/12/21, submitted to Ann Rheum Dis 9/27/21, rejected 10/10/21, challenged 10/11/21)

Non Peer-Reviewed Publications (*Ike first or senior author)

*1.       Ike RW, Lampman RM, Castor CW.  Arthritis and aerobic exercise: A review.  Physician and Sports Medicine 1989;17(2):128-139. doi: 10.1080/00913847.1989.11709710.

*2.       Ike RW, Lampman RM, Castor CW.  How aerobic exercise can help arthritis patients.  Your Patient and Fitness (For Orthopedic Surgeons) 1990;3(3):4-8.

*3.       Ike RW.  Refractory knee arthritis: When to consider arthroscopy.  J Musculoskeletal Medicine 1991;8(4):45-63.

*4.       Ike RW.  Acute calf pain and swelling in a 45-year old man, or approaching a swollen calf without having a cow.  Prim Care Rheumatol 1992;2(4):6-10.

*5.       Ike RW, Harris C, Lane N, Stulberg SD (Mechcatie E).  Needle arthroscopy: a new window on arthritis.  International Medical News Group. Special Report on Arthritis 1992:4-7.

*6.       Ike RW.  The role of arthroscopy in the differential diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the knee.  Rheum Dis Clin N Am 1993;19(3):673-696.

*7.       O’Rourke KS, Ike RW.  Diagnostic arthroscopy in the arthritis patient.  Rheum Dis Clin N Am 1994;20(2):321-342.

*8.       Ike RW.  Arthroscopy: An outcome measure of synovitis?  Rheumatol Eur 1995;2(Suppl 2):134-138.

*9.       O’Rourke KS, Ike RW.  Muscle biopsy.  Curr Opin Rheumatol 1995;7(6):462-468.  doi: 10.1097/00002281-199511000-00002.

*10.     Ike RW.  Diagnostic arthroscopy.  Baillière’s Clin Rheumatol 1996;10(3):495-517.  doi: 10.1016/s0950-3579(96)80046-x

*11.     Ike RW.  Bacterial arthritis. Curr Opin Rheumatol 1998;10(4):330-334.  doi: 10.1097/00002281-199807000-00009.

*12.     Ike B.  Reflections on a cycling excursion in Chile.  Rheuminations Spring 2015.

*13.     Ike B.  Goodbye Sue.  South County News.  July 2020 Issue 86:8.  https://southcountynews.org/2020/07/09/goodbye-sue/

Books and Book Chapters (*Ike first or senior author)

*1.       Arnold WJ, Ike RW.  Specialized procedures in the management of patients with rheumatic diseases, in Cecil Textbook of Medicine, JB Wyngaarden, LH Smith and JC Bennett, Editors.  Nineteenth edition.  1991, WB Saunders: Philadelphia. p. 1503-1508.

*2.       Ike RW.  Arthroscopy, in Rheumatology Medical Knowledge Self Assessment Program (MKSAP), JH Klippel, J Esdaile, NM Hadler, LA Healey, BL Kotzin, HS Luthra, WJ, McCune, RP Polisson and BD Schwartz.  1993, American College of Physicians: Philadelphia. p. 212-215.

*3.       Ike RW, Arnold WJ.  Specialized procedures in the management of patients with rheumatic diseases, in Cecil Textbook of Medicine, JC Bennett and F Plum, Editors.  Twentieth edition.  1996, WB Saunders: Philadelphia. p. 1455-1459.

*4.       Kalunian KC, Moreland L, Ike RW.  Arthroscopy, in Arthritis and Allied Conditions, WJ Koopman, Editor.  Thirteenth edition.  1996, Williams & Wilkins: Baltimore. p. 103-114.

*5.       Ike RW.  Bacterial arthritis, in Arthritis and Allied Conditions, WJ Koopman, Editor.  Thirteenth edition.  1996, Williams & Wilkins: Baltimore. p. 2267-2295.

*6.       Ike RW.  Therapeutic injection of joints and soft tissues, in Primer on the Rheumatic Diseases, JH Klippel, Editor.  Eleventh edition.  1997, Arthritis Foundation: Atlanta. p. 419-421.

*7.       Ike RW.  Minimally invasive procedures, in Rheumatology, JH Klippel, PA Dieppe, Editors.  Second edition.  1997, Mosby-Wolfe: London. p.2.13.1-2.13.10.

*8.       Ike RW.  Joint lavage, in Osteoarthritis, KD Brandt, M Doherty and S Lohmander, Editors.  1998, Oxford University Press: Oxford. p. 359-377.

*9.       Ike RW, Arnold WJ.  Specialized procedures in the management of patients with rheumatic diseases, in Cecil Textbook of Medicine, L Goldman and JC Bennett, Editors.  Twenty-first edition.  1999, WB Saunders: Philadelphia. p. 1487-1491.

*10.     Ike RW.  Bacterial arthritis, in Arthritis and Allied Conditions, WJ Koopman, Editor. Fourteenth edition.  2000, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins: Philadelphia. p. 2570-2599.

*11.     Ike RW. Therapeutic injection of joints and soft tissues, in Primer on the Rheumatic Diseases, JH Klippel, Editor.  Twelfth edition.  2001, Arthritis Foundation: Atlanta. p. 579-582.

*12.     Ike RW.  Minimally invasive procedures, in Rheumatology, MC Hochberg, J Silman, JS Smolen, ME Weinblatt, and MH Weisman, Editors.  Third edition.  2003, Harcourt Health Sciences: London. p. 245-252.  ISBN 0323024041

*13.     O’Rourke KS and Ike R. Minimally invasive procedures. inPractice Rheumatology 2015, Clinical Care Options, Reston VA.  Available at: http://www.inpractice.com

*14.     Ike R.  The Accident.  Amazon (Kindle) 2021.  Available at: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B095BS8VRJ

*15.     Ike B.  Lost in the Ozone…Again!  The Commander, his Boys, and Me.  50 years and Counting.  Amazon (Kindle) 2021.  Available at https://www.amazon.com/Lost-Ozone-Again-Commander-counting-ebook/dp/B096KY4Z4D/ref=sr_1_3?dchild=1&keywords=Bob+Ike&qid=1624277207&sr=8-3

*16.     Ike R.  Musing through a Pandemic.  My year and a half with Mr. Corona.  Volume I.  about Mr. Corona.  Amazon (Kindle) 2021.  ISBN: 9798530730

*17.     Ike R.  Musing through a Pandemic.  On the sidelines.  Volume II.  Interpersonal relationships.  Amazon (Kindle) 2021.  ISBN: 9798531225023

*19.     Ike R.  Musing through a Pandemic.  On the Sidelines.  Volume III.  Indulgences.  Amazon (Kindle) 2021.  ISBN: 9798531231062

*20.     Ike RW.  Review of benign subcutaneous emphysema following knee arthroscopy.  Ch 7 In New Frontiers in Medicine and Medical Research. Volume 3, TM Amine, editor 2021, Book Publisher International, London, p. 64-8.  ISBN-13 (15) 978-93-5547-085-0 (Print), 978-93-5547-086-7 (eBook).  https://stm.bookpi.org/RDMMR-V3/article/view/4154

*21.     Ike R.  Musing through a pandemic.  On the sidelines.  Volume IV.  Then play on.  Amazon (Kindle) 2021.  ISBN: 9798780303411

*22.     Ike R.  Musing through a pandemic.  On the sidelines.  Volume V.  Foodies!.  Amazon (Kindle) 2022.  ISBN: 9798811634828.  Published 8/26/22

Other Media (*Ike first or senior author)

  1. Palchik NS, Holmes S, Garrity CR, Kemp J, Ike RW, Lampman RM, Barr PA.  Strong body – stronger bones!  Exercise Manual, Instructor’s Manual, Video Tape. © 1991, The University of Michigan.
  2. Mahowald ML, Agudelo CA, Bomalaski JS, Decker JL, DeHoratius R, Edwards NL, Goldman JA, Ike RW, Klassen L W, Maricic MJ, Messner RP, Miller SB, Rahn DW, Weinstein A, Ytterberg S.  ACR Core Curriculum in Clinical Rheumatology.  Syllabus, Slides. © 1993, The American College of Rheumatology.

*3.       Ike RW.  Theviewfromharbal.com (Bob Ike’s blog).  San Francisco: WordPress.com.    First post 1/12/20.  Available at https://theviewfromharbal.com/

4.         Commander Cody and His Lost Planet Airmen.  John Sinclair Freedom Rally performance.  (from Ten for Two, premiered 4/1/72.  Produced by John Lennon and Yoko Ono).  Posted to YouTube by RW Ike 3/3/21. Available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZ21BHiSlJ4

5.         Commander Cody and His Lost Planet Airmen.  Seeds and stems again blues (from Ten for Two, premiered 4/1/72.  Produced by John Lennon and Yoko Ono).  Published on YouTube by RW Ike 3/4/21.  Available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eb_Bz4SssxM

6.         Commander Cody and His Lost Planet Airmen.  Jailhouse Rock.  (from Ten for Two, premiered 4/1/72.  Produced by John Lennon and Yoko Ono).  Posted to YouTube by RW Ike 3/4/21.  Available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w0rYQ97fJBU

7.         Commander Cody and His Lost Planet Airmen.  Everybody’s doing it (from Hollywood Boulevard, premiered 4/25/76.  Produced by Jon Davison).  Published YouTube by RW Ike 3/4/21.  Available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YI73MfmDYSM

8.         Commander Cody and His Lost Planet Airmen.  Hot Rod Lincoln.  (from Ten for Two, premiered 4/1/72.  Produced by John Lennon and Yoko Ono).  Posted to YouTube by RW Ike 3/19/21.  Available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c8TeHA4UL_8

*9.       McCoy SS, Ike RW.  Labial salivary gland biopsy demonstration.  Posted to YouTube by RW Ike 8/19/21.  Available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jIFkBjKSxas

*10.     McCoy SS., Ike RW.  Labial salivary gland biopsy workshop.  Posted to YouTube by RW Ike 8/30/21.  Available at: https://youtu.be/iHP58yNkhW8.

Abstracts

  1. Ike RW, Schnitzer TJ.  Septic arthritis due to group G streptococci is associated with abnormalities of the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts.  Arthritis Rheum 1985;28(4):S85.
  2. Fudman, EJ, Ike RW, Golbus J.  Scleromyxedema: An unusual cause of inflammatory myopathy.  Clin Res 1985;33:918A.
  3. Ike R, Arnold W, Simon C, Eisenberg G, Batt M, White G.  Reactive arthritis syndrome (RAS) following an epidemic of salmonella gastroenteritis (SG).  Clin Res 1986;34:A618.
  4. Ike R, Arnold W, Simon C, Eisenberg G, Batt M, White G.  Reactive arthritis syndrome following an epidemic of salmonella gastroenteritis.  Arthritis Rheum 1986;29(4):S31.
  5. Fudman, EJ, Golbus J, Ike RW.  The myopathy of scleromyxedema.  Arthritis Rheum 1986;29(4):S48.
  6. Ike RW.  A case of arthritis with polyneuropathy.  Thieves’ Market: American Rheumatism Association Central Regional Meeting, Chicago, IL.  November 1, 1986.
  7. Ike, RW, Arnold WJ, Simon C, Eisenberg GM.  Tidal knee irrigation as an intervention for chronic pain due to osteoarthritis of the knee.  Arthritis Rheum 1987;30(l Suppl):S17.
  8. Ike RW, Arnold WJ.  Correlations between radiographic changes, meniscal chondrocalcinosis and other intra-articular abnormalities in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee undergoing arthroscopy.  Arthritis Rheum 1987;30(l Suppl):S17 and 30(4 Suppl):S13.
  9. Ike RW, Arnold WJ, Simon CM, Eisenberg GM.  Reactive arthritis syndrome following Salmonella gastroenteritis; One-year follow-up of the Chicago epidemic.  Arthritis Rheum 1987;30(l Suppl):S20 and 30(4 Suppl):S24.
  10. Palchik NS, Ike RW, Skene PJ.  Considerations in the design of a statewide exercise and educational program for adults at risk for osteoporosis.  Arthritis Rheum 1988;31:(4 Suppl):S160.
  11. Ike RW, Verbrugge LM, et al.  Arthritis, comorbidity, and disability.  The Gerontology Society of America Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA.  November 22, 1988.
  12. Ike RW.  Rheumatologic arthroscopy at a university medical center: The first 24 cases.  Arthritis Rheum 1989;32:(1 Suppl):R29.
  13. Ike RW.  Rheumatologic arthroscopy at a university medical center: The first 45 cases.  Arthritis Rheum 1989;32:(4 Suppl):S19.
  14. Palchik NS, Wolf FM, Cassidy JT, Ike RW, Davis WK.  Effects of training on confirmatory bias and rheumatology content in medical student decision making.  Arthritis Rheum 1989;32:(4 Suppl):S100.
  15. Verbrugge LM, Lepkowski JM, Ike RW.  Arthritis, comorbidity, and disability.  Arthritis Rheum 1989;32:(4 Suppl):S101.
  16. Palchik NA, Ike RW, Lampman, RM, Holmes SB, Dedrick RF.  Design and formative evaluation of two exercise protocols for women at risk for osteoporosis.  Arthritis Care Res 1989;2(1 Suppl):S16.
  17. Palchik NS, Ike RW, Holmes SB, Lampman RM, Brown JM, Kemp JC, Dedrick RF.  Self-reported influences on exercise adherence in women at risk for osteoporosis.  Arthritis Care Res 1989;2(1 Suppl):S21.
  18. O’Rourke K, Blaivas M, Ike RW.  Utility of needle muscle biopsy in a university rheumatology practice.  Arthritis Rheum 1990;33(5 Suppl):R30 and 33(9 Suppl):S70.
  19. Ike RW.  Arthroscopy in septic arthritis: Spectrum of applications.  Arthritis Rheum 1990;33(9 Suppl):S87.
  20. Palchik NS, Lampman RM, Ike RW, Holmes SB, Shapiro B, Sowers MR, Oh MS, Wan JY.  History of physical activity in relation to bone density in women at risk for osteoporosis.  Arthritis Care Res 1990:3(2):S19.
  21. Ike RW, O’Rourke KS.  Detection of intra-articular abnormalities in osteoarthritis of the knee: A pilot study comparing needle arthroscopy with standard arthroscopy.  Arthritis Rheum 1991;34(9 Suppl):S85.
  22. Ike R, Oh M, Lampman R, Kemp J, Holmes S, Shapiro B, Palchik N.  Effects of three differently focused exercise programs on physical performance and bone mineral content in healthy premenopausal women at risk for osteoporosis.  Arthritis Rheum 1991;34(9 Suppl):S192.
  23. Ike RW.  Rheumatologic arthroscopy at a university medical center: The first 100 cases.  Arthroscopy Study Group, American College of Rheumatology Annual Meeting, Boston, MA.  November 18, 1991.
  24. Keroack BJ, Lunquist C, Ike RW.  Idiopathic capsular constriction of the hip, an under appreciated cause of hip pain.  Arthritis Rheum 1992;35(5 Suppl):S123.
  25. Ike RW.  A woman with shoulder pain and fever.  Thieves’ Market: American College of Rheumatology Central Regional Meeting, Chicago, IL.  April 5, 1992.
  26. Dedrick DK, Flechtenmacher J, Chata AS, Aisen AM, Taylor R, Ike RW, McCune WJ.  Detection of osteoarthritis of the knee using magnetic resonance imaging, needle and standard arthroscopy with histologic correlation.  Arthritis Rheum 1992;35(Suppl):S134.
  27. Ike RW, O’Rourke KS.  Development and integration of needle arthroscopy into an existing university-based rheumatologic arthroscopy program.  Arthritis Rheum 1992;35(Suppl):S292.
  28. O’Rourke KS, Ike RW.  Can physical examination of the knee predict articular cartilage abnormalities in patients undergoing needle arthroscopy?  Arthritis Rheum 1992;35(Suppl):S322.
  29. Ike RW.  Arthroscopy in rheumatology fellowship training.  Arthroscopy Study Group, American College of Rheumatology Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA/ October 12, 1992.
  30. Laing TJ, Ike RW, Griffiths CE, Cooper KD, Grober JS, Keroack BK, Toth MB, Richardson BC.  A pilot study of the effect of oral 8-methoxypsoralen and intra-articular ultraviolet light on rheumatoid synovitis.  Arthritis Rheum 1993;36(Suppl 9):S57.
  31. Ike RW.  Tidal irrigation: A potential alternative to surgical drainage in “refractory” septic arthritis and septic bursitis.  Arthritis Rheum 1993;36(Suppl 9):S165.
  32. Ike RW, O’Rourke KS.  Compartment directed physical exam of the knee can predict articular cartilage abnormalities disclosed by needle arthroscopy.  Arthritis Rheum 1993;36(Suppl 9):S165.
  33. Ike RW.  Synovial biopsy using a manually-operated rotary shaver blade: A low-cost technique for arthroscopically-guided and closed approaches.  Arthritis Rheum 1994;37(Suppl 9):S416.
  34. Klashman DJ, Moreland LW, Ike RW, Kalunian KC.  Occult presence of CPPD crystals in patients undergoing arthroscopic knee irrigation for refractory pain related to OA.  Arthritis Rheum 1994;37(Suppl 9):S240.
  35. Klashman D, Ike R, Moreland L, Skovron ML, Kalunian K.  Validation of an osteoarthritis data report form for knee arthroscopy.  Arthritis Rheum 1995;38(Suppl 9):S178.
  36. Rich E, Moreland L, Myers S, Ike R, Skovron ML, Klashman D, Kalunian K.  Inflammation in early osteoarthritis of the knee: An arthroscopic perspective.  Arthritis Rheum 1995;38(Suppl 9):S237.
  37. Kalunian K, Klashman D, Singh R, Myers S, Ike R, Skovron ML, O’Rourke K, Rich E, Heck L, Moreland L.  Office-based arthroscopy in early osteoarthritis of the knee: Preliminary results of a multi-center study of the effects of visually guided irrigation on outcome.  Arthritis Rheum 1995;38(Suppl 9):S241.
  38. Friedman J, Larson W, Sorenson E, Ike R.  How should peripheral neuropathy associated with primary Sjögren’s be treated?  Arthritis Rheum 1996;39(Suppl 9):S63.
  39. Klashman D, Seeger L, Singh R, Moreland L, Ike R, Skovron ML, Kalunian K.  Validation of nonradiographic ACR osteoarthritis classification criteria using ACR arthroscopy damage index as comparison standard.  Arthritis Rheum 1996;39(Suppl 9):S172.
  40. Kalunian K, Singh R, Klashman D, Myers S, Ike R, Skovron ML, Moreland L.  Crystalline material in early knee osteoarthritis predicts outcome after arthroscopic irrigation.  Arthritis Rheum 1996;39(Suppl 9):S173.
  41. Ognenowski VM, Kazmers IS, Ike RW.  Septic arthritis due to atypical mycoplasmatales in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia.  Arthritis Rheum 1996;39(Suppl 9):S182.
  42. Kaplan MJ, Ike RW.  Is the liver a common extraglandular target in primary Sjögren’s?  Arthritis Rheum 1996;39(Suppl 9):S182.
  43. Concoff A, Moreland L, Skovron ML, Myers S, Ike R, Klashman D, Singh R, Alas A, Rich E, Heck L, Kalunian K.  Office-based arthroscopic irrigation in early knee osteoarthritis: Results of a multi-center study.  Arthritis Rheum 1997;40(Suppl 9):S86.
  44. Sant SM, Kaplan MJ, Stafford Johnson DB, Blaivas M, Ike RW.  Myositis is not reliably predicted by magnetic resonance imaging in patients with suspected inflammatory myopathy. Arthritis Rheum 1997;40(Suppl 9):S147.
  45. Concoff A, Singh R, Klashman D, Alas A, Moreland L, Rich E, Heck L, Myers S, Ike R, Skovron ML, Kalunian K.  A clinical algorithm for identifying occult crystalline disease in patients with knee osteoarthritis.  Arthritis Rheum 1997;40(Suppl 9):S239.
  46. Brion P, Moreland L, Myers S, Ike R, Klashman D, Concoff A, Rich E, Skovron ML, Kalunian K. Visually-guided irrigation in early knee osteoarthritis: A multi-center randomized controlled trial.  Arthritis Rheum 2000;43(Suppl 9):S338.
  47. Duffy TN, Ike R, Kane D, Kraan M, Mierau M, Reece R, Veale D, FitzGerald O.  The MacroMIST Initiative: A valid and reliable macroscopic grading system for the severity of synovitis.  Arthritis Rheum 2003;48(Suppl 9):S625.
  48. Basu D, Ike RW.  Septic arthritis due to Aspergillus species in immunocompetent patients.  Arthritis Rheum 2005;52(12):4105.
  49. Ellis CN, Kia KF, Nair R, Ike RW, Hiremagalore R, Voorhees JJ, Elder JT.  Patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis have increased rates of serological markers for gluten sensitivity and coeliac sprue.  Br J Derm 2006; 154
  50. Basu D, Ike RW.  Etiology, Clinical Presentation and Outcome of Life-threatening Cryoglobulinemic Vasculitis in a Tertiary Hospital at Michigan.  Arthritis Rheum 2007;56 (12): 4307
  51. Kissen E, Nishio J, Yang M, Backhaus M, Balint P, Bruyn G, Craig-Muller J, D’Agnostino M, Feoktistov A, Goyal J, Iagnocco A, Ike R, Moller I, Naredo E, Pineda C, Schmidt W, Swen N, Tabechian D, Wakefield R, Wells A, Kaeley G.  Ultrasound Waves across the Atlantic: The International Musculoskeletal Ultrasound Exercise.  Arthritis Rheum 2008; 58 (suppl9):S682
  52. Butler R, Ike RW, Davenport RD, Yamada C. Psoriatic Spondyloarthropathy: Response to Plasmapheresis. Transfusion 2010;50(2S)(Suppl);84A
  53. Genome-wide association analysis of psoriatic arthritis.  Nair R, Stuart P, Tsoi L, Ellinghaus E, Walsh J, Chandran V, Tejasvi T, Esko T, Duffin K, Ike R, Bowcock A, Voorhees J, Lim H, Weichenthal M, Franke A, Rahman P, Krueger G, Abecasis G, Gladman and Elder J.   Br J Dermatol 2014; 171: e111
  54. Moses V, Asirvatham J, McHugh J, Ike R.  Role of synovial biopsy in diagnosis of crystal arthropathy.  Arthritis Rheum 2016; 68 (suppl 10): 222
  55. Mandelin A, Homan P, Cuda C, Homan PJ, Domininguez ST, Bridges SL, Bathon JM, Atkinson JP, Fox D, Matteson EL, Buckley CD, Pitzalis C, Parks D, Hughes LB, Geraldino-Pardilla LB, Ike RW, Wright K, Filer A, Kelly S, Bacalao E, Ruderman EM, Pope R, Perlman H, Winter DRAB0220 The promise of ultrasound guided minimally invasive synovial biopsies in the United States.  Ann Rheum Dis 2017;76:1125.

News items featuring Dr. Ike

Congrats!  Robert Ike, M.D.  Rheuminations Summer 2019. https://myemail.constantcontact.com/Michigan-Medicine-Rheumatology-Newsletter—Summer-2019.html?soid=1122821646785&aid=1JgxuIFg020. P2.

Bernstein S.  Intensive, personalized learning.  The Rheumatologist August 2, 2019. https://www.the-rheumatologist.org/article/new-video-shows-how-to-perform-a-lip-biopsy-to-diagnose-sjogrens-syndrome/

Moore S.  Dr. Ike plans to write about 1968 Vicksburg car accident.  South County News April 2020.  https://southcountynews.org/2020/04/18/dr-ike-plans-to-write-about-1968-vicksburg-car-accident/

Oswalt-Forsythe K.  Three authors with local ties self-publish. South County News August 2022 https://southcountynews.org/2021/08/16/three-authors-with-local-ties-self-publish/

Bernstein S.  New video shows how to perform a lip biopsy to diagnose Sjögren’s syndrome.  The Rheumatologist November 14, 2021.  https://www.the-rheumatologist.org/article/new-video-shows-how-to-perform-a-lip-biopsy-to-diagnose-sjogrens-syndrome/

Articles pertaining to Arthroscopy since “Time for a new look” (March, 2018)

Ike R, Baskaran A, Chao J, Concoff AL, Wu CW, Sun B, MD, Brion PH, Arnold EL, Klashman DJ, FitzGerald J, Kalunian KC.  Prevalence of crystalline disease in knee osteoarthritis: experience from patients undergoing arthroscopic procedures. J Clin Rheumatol 2019;25(1):51-53.  https://doi: 10.1097/RHU.0000000000000744.https://journals.lww.com/jclinrheum/Citation/2019/01000/Prevalence_of_Crystals_in_Knee_Osteoarthritis_.11.aspx

Ike RW, Arnold WJ, Kalunian KC.  Arthroscopy in rheumatology: a reminiscence.  J Surg Surg Technol 2020;2(1):27-35.  https://www.jsurgery.com/articles/arthroscopy-in-rheumatology-a-reminiscence.pdf

Ike RW, Arnold WJ, Kalunian KC.  Arthroscopy in rheumatology.  Where have we been?  Where might we go?  Rheumatol (Oxford) 2021;60:518–528.  Epub 2020 Dec 1 https://doi: 10.1093/rheumatology/keaa560.

Ike RW, Kalunian KC, Arnold WJ.  Why not wash out the OA knee?  J Clin Rheumatol 2021;27(2)43-45.  https://doi: 10.1097/RHU.0000000000001672

Ike RW, Kalunian KC.  Arthroscopy in rheumatology. Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 2021;37(5):1364-1365. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2021.02.024

Ike RW, Kalunian KC.  Will rheumatologists ever pick up an arthroscope again?  Int J Rheum Dis 2021;24:1235–1246.  Epub 2021 July 29.  https://doi: 10.1111/1756-185X.14184

Ike RW.  How to wash out a knee.  J Biomed Res Environ Sci. 2021 Sept 29; 2(9): 846-848. doi: 10.37871/jbres1320, Article ID: JBRES1320, Available at: https://www.jelsciences.com/articles/jbres1320.pdf

Ike RW.  Can bedside knee joint washout help treat septic arthritis?  Ann Orthop Rheumatol 2021; 8(1):1097.  Doi:10.47739/otolaryngology.1097.  https://www.jscimedcentral.com/Orthopedics/orthopedics-8-1097.pdf

Ike RW.  Why would a rheumatologist want to wield an arthroscope?  EC Orthopaedics 2021;12(12):57-62. https://www.ecronicon.com/ecor/pdf/ECOR-12-00883.pdf

Ike RW.  Who let this flea into my operating room?  Clin Med 2021;3(3):1039 http://www.medtextpublications.com/open-access/who-let-this-flea-in-my-operating-room-960.pdf

Ike RW, Kalunian KC.  Regarding arthroscopy: can orthopedists and rheumatologists be friends?  J Clin Rheumatol (accepted 9/11/21)

Ike RW.  Review of benign subcutaneous emphysema following knee arthroscopy.  Ch 7 In New Frontiers in Medicine and Medical Research. Volume 3, TM Amine, editor 2021, Book Publisher International, London, p. 64-8.  SBN-13 (15) 978-93-5547-085-0 (Print), 978-93-5547-086-7 (eBook).  https://stm.bookpi.org/RDMMR-V3/article/view/4154

brother Nick’s truck driver’s chicken

After another delicious dinner of this easy, simple, cheap dish, I decided I had to share it.  I owe it to my brother Nick, who drives the truck he owns for a living.  As I was remarking on the impressive weight loss he’s managed to achieve while the rest of us still struggle with COVID pounds, he mentioned this staple for on-road eating.  After throwing some chicken drums and thighs into a crock pot with onions and such, he spreads the result on flat bread which he rolls up into hand-held sandwiches stored into a plastic box under his seat, ready to reach in and eat whenever he got hungry.  Sounded good to me.  I gave it a go and it turned out pretty good.

I sent it to Nick and he said it was pretty close to what he did.  When you can get 5# of chicken quarters for 5 bucks or less, it’s a pretty good deal.  Nick doesn’t add stock and the mix I get using it has about ¾ C juice you could strain off and save for other purposes (it’s delicious).

Part 2 of the feast is the bread you wrap this in.  Any of the various flatbreads you might buy will do.  Heck, you can probably plop it on a regular bun and call it a chicken sloppy joe.  But if you’ve got a bread machine, you can make your own naan, that delicious slightly crusty warm flat bread you thought you could only get in an Indian restaurant.  But it’s easy peasy.  The machine makes the dough and you and your iron skillet make the bread.  It’s what we do and I recommend it highly.

Heck, this could probably sustain you for six days on the road (1)

References

  1. Dave Dudley. Six days on the road. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ncw-CwRwRo

device

My dentist no longer uses laughing gas, but none was needed on my visit to his office this morning.   I was there to get a new crown to replace one I’d lost.  The tedium of the injections and grinding with pauses to let the former take effect to make the latter tolerable began to get interrupted when Doc commented on his observations of the bed for the new crown.  Realize that conversations at the dentist’s are stilted, with something always done when the patient opens up his briefly freed mouth.

Doc: You probably lost this crown quite a while ago, as the remaining tooth protrudes more than it did when we did the last crown.  It’s had time to grow a little.

(pause)

Me:  I really don’t know when it happened.  I’m not in the habit of panning my stool for gold.  Whenever it did happen, my net worth dropped that day.

Doc: You needed a metal detector

(pause)

Me: A new essential bathroom appliance!

(pause)

Me:  Maybe it can be paired with a bidet to give a combination device

By then, all were thinking we were on to something, till Doc spoke up

Doc:  Bob, I don’t think you’d have a very big market for your device

Me: We just need the right celebrity spokesman

The group discussed who that might be as my mouth was full again

Me:  It’s clear to me.  Hire one of the two best known posteriors in show biz: Kim Kardashian or Jennifer Lopez

(pause)

Me: My good friend Ken at UCSD is Kim’s cousin.

So, Kim became the obvious choice.  She couldn’t find the gig beneath her dignity and with her jewelry collection and eating habits, she’d obviously had at least one experience where such a device would have helped her out.

Assistant: you could call it the “Gold Digger”

We all agreed that was apt for Kim also.

Doc:  So, who will be the go between on this?

Me:   Ken, like all my friends, likes my wife Kathy better than me.  Plus, he has lots of Hollywood connections and managed her in her attempt to break into the movies in the 90s.  (I threw in some details of how that went down)

So woman to woman and all that.

With the tedium of prep work completed, Doc proceeded with the more intense task of seeding the crown, and the conversations petered out.

But after Doc made his final remarks to me and was waving bye, I told him “You know, my best friend from childhood is a patent attorney.  I’ll be sure to include you on the discussions.”

As I paid for the visit, I hoped that our new product would make a killing.

wifey’s home

As the summer of ’81 waned in New Hudson, Ohio, Kathy Clark packed her life into her yellow Nova to head north to Ann Arbor and grad school, closing out the last “free” summer she’d see for several decades.  She was leaving behind her high school teacher’s post at Western Reserve Academy to see what she might do with this Kinesiology thing.  U of M didn’t pay her right off the bat and she had to put in early mornings at the Bagel Factory to make ends meet.  Teaching “Dance for Fitness” (or “Dance for Fatness”, as she liked to call it) brought her first U paycheck and her PhD research was going well enough 2 ½ years later to land a collaboration with a young post-doctoral fellow in Rheumatology.  The rest is – as they say – history (1).  Unlike her football season tickets, her duties at the U were interrupted a couple of times so when she decided in the Winter of ’20 she’d hang ‘em up at the end of that term, the big bad U said pas si vite!  That didn’t stop us from having a big blowout retirement party on her birthday that summer (2), but it was back in the saddle that Fall for one more half-time term, with another added on for good measure so her Dean could keep her as Associate Chair.  But this June, she finally packed up her academic life and her campus office no longer bears her name.  As always happens at the U, once you’re gone they write nice things about you.  The piece below is in the Fall 2022 issue of Movement, publication of the School of Kinesiology.  I’m sure the readers of this blog have heard plenty about me, so for a change I thought I’d give you a longer peak at my dear wifey.  Yes, I’m the luckiest man in the world.

References

  1. Ike B.  How we met.  WordPress 2/6/20.  https://theviewfromharbal.com/2020/02/06/how-we-met/

2. Ike B.  Wasn’t that a party?  WordPress 7/17/21.  https://theviewfromharbal.com/2021/07/17/wasnt-that-a-party/

CC COL

I wrote this shortly after I’d received the sad news that George Frayne IV, (U of M BFA ’66, MFA ’68) – A.K.A. Commander Cody – had passed as of 9/26/21. I never posted it, but now that his life is being celebrated across the country, I think it’s time.

Some readers of this blog may have picked up by now my deathless devotion to that 70s band out of Ann Arbor, Commander Cody and his Lost Planet Airmen.  Has any band had a wilder name?  And, I submit, no band was more fun.  In my life, I’ve never had more fun than what I felt at a Commander Cody concert.  I wrote a small book about the joyous, raucous relationships I’ve had with the band and its offshoots over the past half century (1) a new edition is coming, and I’ve posted a loving blog about my celebration of the 50th anniversary of my first seeing them in concert (2).  While it was a hobby of mine in college to kype concert posters, I never snagged the one for that show.  I’ve since located it – kyped from the Commander’s web page – and it hangs proudly in my entryway, first thing you see as you come in the door. 

Now that the Commander is dead can we elevate his band to the immortals?  The remaining Lost Planet Airmen still play about in various guises, with enthusiasm.  But the originals all together were so special and unique, we need to take every opportunity to experience them.  Sure, between the whole band and the Commander himself, they’ve put out a host of CDs with the same songs over and over.  But I’ve just become aware of a new release that anyone who is CC&hLPA curious needs to hear.  Released on www.sunsetblvdrecords.com, the two disc set even states that a dollar of each purchase will go to the American Cancer Society in the memory of George Frayne aka Commander Cody.  It was esophageal cancer that finally took him on 9/26/01 after a 3 year struggle.  Fortunately, the band left a trail of tapes to be tapped.  This new CD set – “Strange Adventures on Planet Earth” – is one of them. 

Don’t the boys look mellow?

Recorded across a number of live dates in ’73 and ’74 ranging from Australia to Rotterdam to Stony Brook, the band is at the top of their game.  An indication they’re at the end of the line is that Ernie Hagar is on pedal steel, replacing Bobby “Blue” Black, who’d replaced West Virginia Creeper.  Ernie was no slouch, an ace pedal steel player, recording since ’65.  At the end of the last cut on the first disc  – “Hey-hey-hey-hey” John Tichy calls to the audience “We love you, goodbye!”.  Is that it?  Fortunately, disc 2 opens with Billy C. singing “There’s good rockin’ tonight”, and for 13 more cuts, there surely is.  How can you not like a set that begins with “Hot Rod Lincoln” and ends with “Too Much Fun”?  In between is all that Commander music that serves poorly to promote sedate and sober behavior.  But sometimes, that’s just what we need.

$23.99 on Amazon and worth every penny, IMHO.  If you want to immerse yourself in an hour and half of the Commander Cody experience – accompanied by the intoxicant(s) of your choice, of course – this would be the dive I’d recommend.

If you want to have a little taste first, check out their performance at the John Sinclair Freedom Rally at Crisler Arena in Ann Arbor December 1971 (3).  On a bill that included Stevie Wonder, Phil Ochs, Bob Seger, Archie Shepp, Joy of Cooking, David Peel, Teagarden and VanWinkle, the Up, and John Lennon (yes, the Beatle), they stole the show before the 17,000 assembled.  Here’s their performance, ripped from “Ten for Two” the documentary of the event bankrolled by John and Yoko (she was there, too).  The set includes their big hit and the saddest song ever written.  Fortunately, the boys move right into “There’s a riot going on”, so you barely have time to put away the razor blades and the barbituates. If you want an extended concert, check out their radio concert from 1975 (4).

Chances for you to go celebrate the Art, Music, and Life of Commander Cody are fading. Already we’ve had gatherings in Troy NY and Mill Valley California. So any of the Cody faithful, and the Cody LPA guys showed up in NY, are coming.  The Troy NY gathering was fabulous (5). Mill Valley was diluted by a lot of the “Western airmen” that accompanied him when he was out there. We’ll miss NYC as we’ll be in Chicago. Troy was magnificent, as I wrote. Rumors are for an album, so keep tuned.

As the Commander and his boys sung many times “Don’t let go” (6).

References

1.         Ike B.  Lost in the Ozone…Again!  The Commander, his Boys, and Me.  50 years and Counting.  Amazon (Kindle) 2021.  Available at https://www.amazon.com/Lost-Ozone-Again-Commander-counting-ebook/dp/B096KY4Z4D/ref=sr_1_3?dchild=1&keywords=Bob+Ike&qid=1624277207&sr=8-3 (no longe available.)

2.         Ike B.  Two triple cheese….  WordPress.com 4/17/21 https://theviewfromharbal.com/2021/04/17/two-triple-cheese/

3.         Commander Cody and His Lost Planet Airmen.  John Sinclair Freedom Rally performance.  (from Ten for Two, premiered 4/1/72.  Produced by John Lennon and Yoko Ono).  Posted to YouTube by RW Ike 3/3/21. Available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZ21BHiSlJ4

4.INTERNET ARCHIVE. Commander Cody-KSAN 1975 Record Plant. KSAN. Commander and https://archive.org/details/CommanderCody-KSAN1975RecordPlant

5.Ike B. Rock don’t cry. WordPress 8/28/22. https://theviewfromharbal.com/2022/08/28/rock-dont-cry/

6.     Commander Cody and His Lost Planet Airmen.  Don’t Let Go (embellished by the Commander’s videography).  YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PZs0NuhOuUs

DTE

Forget the title, this is about electric cars.

In my part of Michigan, we get our electricity and natural gas from DTE.   While the name suggests a Detroit link, the company is based in Cincinnati and serves 3 states (Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky) totaling 13 counties.  The company traces its origins to 1849 as the Detroit Gas Company, formed to supply the city’s gas streetlights. Streetlighting changed when Thomas Edison came to town at the turn of the century.  The gas company survived under various guises, longest as Michigan Consolidated Gas (MichCon).  In 1996, Detroit Edison formed a holding company bearing its stock symbol (DTE) and swallowed up MichCon to make a company that allows us to pay one check for all our home energy needs.  They count 2,244,950 customers (2 transportation accounts, 2,036,506 residential properties, 207,722 commercial customers and 719 industrial accounts) who purchase their electricity from the company. DTE Energy’s consumers are charged an average residential electricity price of 17.86 cents per kilowatt hour, which is 32.59% more than the average US rate of 13.47 cents. In 2020 the company sold 40,629,495 megawatt hours by way of retail sales to end users. Electricity generation facilities owned by DTE Energy produced 47.60% of the megawatt hours sourced by the supplier and an additional 52.40% was procured on the wholesale electricity market. So, when calculating the key metric CO2 produced per power generated, figure the denominator to be 19,339,640 megawatt hours.  Their total revenue for 2020 from electricity related activities was $7,561,877,800, with 27.60% coming from wholesale electricity sales and 68.97% from retail sales to end users (1).

The company generates a total of 23,767,774.34 megawatt hours from the burning of coal, which is the 21st most out of 3510 electric providers in the United States (2).  They must be counting coal use by others on the wholesale electricity market from whom they buy electricity to pass on.  DTE Energy’s electricity production plants produce 3,220,046.81 megawatt hours from the use of natural gas.  DTE Energy produces 92.60% of their total electricity production from non-renewable fuels. The total electricity generated from non-renewable sources is 37,309,896.28 megawatt hours, which is 30th highest out of 3510 providers in the country.  DTE Energy generates 2,434,632 megawatt hours of electricity (or 6.04% of their total electricity generation) from wind turbines.  Their biggest source is coal, accounting for 58.99% of fuel used, then comes nuclear (!) at 23.25%, natural gas at 23.25, wind 7.99%, other 6.04%.

DTE remains heavily involved in coal processing (3).  This portion of the company’s history has been purged from their website, and their mines in Appalachia, which account for DTE’s reach into Kentucky, are dormant. But DTE’s wholly owned subsidiary MERC (Midwest Energy Resource Company) operates 15 train sets of 123 cars each to transport the coal from mines mainly in the Powder Ridge Basin of Montana and Wyoming but also from Colorado, Utah and British Columbia to Superior Midwest Energy Terminal (SMET) on St. Louis Bay in Superior Wisconsin, on Lake Michigan. The unit trains travel the 1,000-mile route in approximately two days carrying 14,500 tons of coal.  The coal is primarily for DTE’s coal fired plants but also reaches elsewhere, as stated on their web site “We have sufficient capacity to accommodate the coal transshipment needs of additional electric utilities and industrial firms throughout the Great Lakes region.”

While DTE aims to reduce its emissions to zero by 2050, they have a ways to go (4).  I’ve had trouble getting raw numbers on their total CO2 output but did come across their own calculation 2,141.4 lb. CO2/MWh.   Figuring 2200#/metric ton, that’s 0.973 metric tons/MWh.  That’s almost twice what San Diego Gas and Electric accounts for.  Guess all that coal makes a difference, and the nuclear doesn’t quite offset.

But let’s get into the reason for this post.   How much does it cost to drive an electric car in Michigan, both what we pull out of our pocket and slap at Mother Earth?  Of course, DTE has some plans to ease the pain.  3 all told (5).   One requires a new meter on your house and in turn gives you juice for 11¢/kwh at night (11 PM – 9 AM) and 24 ¢/kwh rest of the time.  That’s only for the juice that flows through your EV charger.  The others charge all juice according to time of day, making it advantageous to stay up late enough to run your dishwasher (and charge your car) at 11 PM.  All good deal rates are subject to suspension should a” Critical Peak Event” be called.

For our analysis, I’d hoped to pull in an electric car more suited to the modest sensibilities of us Michiganders.  True, Teslas are the best-selling electric cars nationwide, but I haven’t seen many even around A square, which has enough well-heeled old hippies to fork over Elon’s tariff.   I’ve been unable to acquire a list of the 10 best selling EVs in Michigan.  So, I’m going completely arbitrary here.  I pulled Car and Driver’s best 12 EVs (6).  Some pretty fancy cars on this list.  Detroit boy that I am (my mom was raised in Detroit, my adoptive dad put in 31 years with Fisher Body, as did I for 4 college summers) I picked the Chevy Bolt, which sold 24,803 units in 2021, despite supply problems that limited inventory.   It’s a pretty and sexy car, if pretty compact.  Although Josh Tavel was titular chief engineer for the original Chevy Volt, its predecessor, Bob Lutz, legendary engineer and GM Vice Chairman then, stood solidly behind the project (7), even though he had called global warming a “total crock of sh**” (8), praising the product as a “magnificent piece of engineering”.   When the car was in concept stage, he pushed for a full electric vehicle, but was overruled by GM’s president John Laukner, who thought that by having a gas engine to charge the lithium battery, “people would not be on a tether” (9).  This more than doubled the complexity of the project and engineers had to design systems both for the internal combustion engine and the electric motor, plus the means by which they would interact.  Toyota managed this with the Prius in 1997, releasing it on the US market in 2001.  Lutz, in an interview several years after he retired from GM, offered that he thought the Volt should have been a pickup truck (10).

So, the power used for charging is 11.5 kw applied for 7 hours, or 80.5 kwh.  That gets you 247 miles, or 3.07 mi/kwh.  With DTE charging an average of 17.86¢/kwh, you’ll be paying 5.82¢/mile.  Could be less if you’ve got one of those fancy plans.  With 0.973 metric tons CO2/MWh, each fill-up generates 0.0841 tons/fill-up.  Taking 40 fill-ups to get you 10,000 miles, that’s about 3.9 metric tons/year.

Let’s bring those Teslas into a Michigan environment for comparison

While I didn’t mean to go all “Car-and-Driver” with this, it’s only fair I show the competitors I’m writing about the two Teslas.

Here’s the luxurious top-of-the-line S model:

And here’s the more modest Y model my friend Ken owns:

Since you seldom base your car purchase on the stat sheet.  I’m sure you’ll agree, both have plenty of “curb appeal”. Let me tell you, it gets even better up close.

Let’s bring back in our Tesla Y for some comparisons using Michigan numbers (15).  Recall that fill-up takes 8 hr. 15 minutes, pushing 11 kw.  That’s 90.75 kw-h/fill-up.  Figuring 303 miles/charge, that’s 3.33 mi/kw-h.  At Michigan prices, that’s 5.3¢/mile.  With those 33 fill-ups per year to reach 10,000 miles, the CO2 belch comes to 2.91 metric tons/year.   The S has a slightly bigger battery. But also is a slightly heavier car, so numbers are similar.  I don’t think you fork over the extra $40K to save 0.6¢/mile.  Those pennies do add up.  If you drive 1,044,386 miles, you’d make up the difference. That’s a lotta charges.

If you like your car stats all in a row, here ya go:

Transmission of electricity over power lines is not 100% efficient.  DTE reports that energy lost through electricity transmission as 4.18% of their electricity production total.  I was going to factor this in just for yucks, but you can just bump up the CO2 and cost numbers accordingly.

It’s just not electric cars coming, but trucks and busses too.  Elon Musk has put out the sexiest, sleekest semi I’ve ever seen (16).

But with that 500-mile range, that poor trucker driving it will have to down a lotta cups of coffee while he waits for his rig to recharge.  You can reserve one for a mere $20K (17), paying the remaining $130K or so upon delivery sometime next year.  Thanks to the “Inflation Reduction Act of 2022”, Uncle will knock $40K off that (18).   You can get an almost new 2022 diesel Peterbilt for $160-230K.  Watch 8 and a half minutes of Tesla truck porn here (19).  Not all those big EVs are Teslas, and sometimes the electrons just don’t provide the needed oomph (20).

New owners of electric cars can expect a few idiosyncrasies that weren’t there with their trust gas-guzzlers.  The biggest of course concerns the juice: getting it, getting enough of it, what to do when it runs out, and realizing what it really came from.  I’ll cover all that a little later, as those concerns confront every driver.  Of the less common happenings, the most common is repair.  Even EVs require maintenance, tho’ much less than a traditional car with more moving parts and fluids to be kept going and flowing.  Although regular EV maintenance is touted as less expensive than that for cars with internal combustion engines (ICE) (21), the reality is somewhat different (22).  The mechanic adept with the internal combustion engine must completely retrain to work on EVs, so just finding someone to fix your car might be a challenge.  Collision repairs are more costly, and the heavier battery laden EVs collide with greater impact.  EV electronics are more complex than in ICE cars, hence more expensive to repair.  And God forbid if you have to replace the battery (23).  Repair shops must extensively retool to serve EV owners, and need to recoup those costs somewhere.  And it can’t help that the after purchase service for Teslas not only sucks be seems malignant (24).

An electric car is basically a rolling computer.  Engineers at Tesla especially, but also other EV makers, are fond of frequent upgrades so the owner is constantly faced with new bells and whistles to master.  The computer display that replaces the dashboard consumes a wide swath of the driver’s field of view.  I thought you were supposed to keep your eyes off the electronic devices while driving!  And, like any computer, EVs can he hacked (25).  Of course, computer communications go two ways.  Mr. Musk keeps a close eye on your driving in turn for offering you his own insurance, far cheaper than conventional insurance provided you drive like Elon wants you to (26).

There have always been car fires.  Gasoline burns, of course.  But boy do those lithium batteries burn!  Everybody likes hot cars, and Jags used to be near the top of the list, but this might not be how to go about it (27).  Here’s a measured and detailed article on the whole EV flambé problem (28).  Yes, it’s real (but gas guzzlers catch fire too), has a known basis from those darned lithium batteries, and is worse with older cars.

flames, but charging affects all drivers.  There aren’t enough charging stations, and at 30¢-60¢/kW-h public charging costs 3 to 5 times more than home charging.  Even the more expensive level 3 chargers take way longer to “fill up” than the time you used to spend at the pump.  Some writers see this problem as the biggest hurdle to wider demand for EVs (29).  Although in reality, it’s the number, not performance, of charging stations that really matters.  If enough drivers convert to make half of all vehicles on the road electric by 2030, 30 million more charging ports will need to be built – 478 per day – a venture that will cost upwards of $35 billion (30).  Right now, the country has over 128,000 public EV charging outlets and at least 4,500 private charging stations – in comparison with about 150,000 gas stations.  It is estimated that the new units will be mostly private 48 million versus 1.2 million public.  An attraction of private chargers is that electricity bought at public chargers is much more expensive, as noted above.  Where all that juice will come from remains an unsettled issue.  Finally, those who want to take their EVs on the great American road will find that freedom shackled by charging issues (31,32).

Despite the inconvenience, negligible net effect on the environment, plus safety issues, you still want one of these coal burners?  Will you be able to afford one?  They cost way more than a gas car to make, and prices are climbing rapidly (33).  Many little companies are jumping into the fray to make EVs, seeing rising demand (34).  While increased competition should mean falling prices, the trend is in the other direction as battery prices skyrocket.  In response Uncle ($7500) (35) and others (e.g., up to $7000 in California, just not on Teslas) (36) have jumped in with tax incentives and rebates for buyers.  As most buyers of EVs are affluent, these programs amount to yet another of those “tax breaks for the rich” one side always rails against.  Those on the lower economic rungs are screwed if they want to virtue signal, when all they can really afford is a used Civic.  California rolled out a program aiming to help these people into a nice EV, but it’s been a horrible mess, with long wait lists and some local programs having to shut down, some running out of funds as early as April (37).  Once again, California shows the nation the way.   Come 2035, you won’t be able to buy a new gas guzzler in the Golden State (38).hhyub

With much of the demand for EVs driven by a concern for the environment, it’s worthwhile to examine the impact of making and driving these vehicles.  I think I’ve already made the point that EVs generate plenty of CO2.  It’s just done at the generating plant and not the tailpipe.  Just as you gotta pull stuff out of the ground to run a gas guzzler, you gotta pull several kinds of stuff out of the ground to keep an EV going.  Digging for the lithium to stock all those batteries is very dirty business, at least as bad for the environment as drilling for and burning hydrocarbons (39).  But it happens halfway around the world, so who cares?  Then ya need that cobalt, and nickel, too.  Ya don’t pick those up by the side of the road.  And who sits on most of the world’s stuff?  Why, our good friends the ChiComs.   Then of course all batteries go dead, and lithium units are no exception.  Ya know how you’re told to take care how you toss your flashlight batteries?   Well, it’s Godzilla versus gecko talking about Li++ batts (40). A little bit can be recycled, but they take up huge amount of space in landfills, leech toxic compounds, and never lose the chance to catch fire.  And as we must never lose sight of the human angle, where are those mobs of angry bipolars, holding signs “Hands off my lithium!”?

As California continues its manic dash to an all-electric future, it behooves us to take a close look at what’s going on out there now (41, 42).  Even the king of EVs, Mr. Musk, cautions that we not transition from oil and gas too quickly, as we risk rending the very fabric of civilization (43).  He’s even calling for an increase in oil and gas production to make up for Russian shortfalls poised to plunge Europe into a frigid winter. The recent California heat wave has taxed their fragile power grid so severely that EV owners have been asked to back off from all that charging, although it’s still o.k. to juice up if that’s your only way to bug out (44).   Seems those EVs fight global warming best when parked in the driveway, a symbol of the owner’s commitment.  What’s that we call it when something is offered to a cause? An oblation?  And if you still have some juice in that parked EV, it can come in handy for other things (45).    Unfortunately, an appreciation of irony is not deeply embedded in the typical Californian’s soul, particularly the self-righteous EV drivers.  More than 15 years ago, Trey Parker and Matt Stone at South Park pointed out the insufferable smugness of Prius drivers (46).  Can you imagine how much worse todays’ EV drivers must be?  Hey, I’m savin’ the f*ckn’ planet, man!  Few Californians would wish to be in West Virginia, but at least there you can get come coal miners to push you to the next charging station when you run out of juice (47).

California has the reputation as the birthplace of trends that eventually sweep the country.  Some, like their Governor Reagan, turn out pretty well.  Could the chaos currently sweeping the Golden State turn into a lesson that might bring sanity to the rest of us who may not possess it already (48)?  There are about 2-3 million electric cars in California, which their grid can’t support in a time of mild crisis.  Should their 2035 mandate play out, there will be at least 10 times as many electric cars.  Is this even, in one of the favored words of the left, “sustainable”?  Or might it be time to take a deep breath and ask where all this madness is going?  Whether the rest of the country should follow California’s suicide pact energy policy is highly debatable, even if Michigan’s previous Gov. Bimbo, currently drawing a government check as Energy Secretary, kinda likes it.  It’s been said that our Constitution is not a suicide pact.  Can we say the same about the fervor to mitigate “climate change”?  Stay tuned, and fill ‘er up!

References

1. FindEnergy.  DTE Energy. https://findenergy.com/providers/dte-energy/#:~:text=Generating%2040%2C291%2C989.05%20megawatt%20hours%20annually%2C%20DTE%20Energy%20is,of%20their%20total%20electricity%20production%20from%20non-renewable%20fuels.

2. DTE.  Fuel mix.  https://www.newlook.dteenergy.com/wps/wcm/connect/dte-web/home/community-and-news/common/environment/fuel-mix

3. DTE.  MERC home.  https://www.newlook.dteenergy.com/wps/wcm/connect/dte-web/dte-pages/merc/company

4. DTE.  Our Bold Goal for Michigan’s Clean Energy Future. https://dtecleanenergy.com/

5. DTE. Electric pricing.  https://newlook.dteenergy.com/wps/wcm/connect/dte-web/home/service-request/residential/electric/pev/pev-res-rate-plans

6. White A.  12 Bestselling Electric Vehicles of 2021.  Car and Driver.  https://www.caranddriver.com/features/g36278968/best-selling-evs-of-2021/

7. Davies A.  How GM Beat Tesla to the First Mass-Market Electric Car.  Wired February 2016.  https://www.wired.com/2016/01/gm-electric-car-chevy-bolt-mary-barra/

8. LaMonica M.  GM vice chairman Lutz calls global warming ‘a total crock’.  CNET 2/25/2008.  https://www.cnet.com/culture/gm-vice-chairman-lutz-calls-global-warming-a-total-crock/

9. 1209u314_admin.  Bob Lutz on How the Chevy Volt Was Born.  GM-Volt 4/26/10.  GM-Volt.   https://www.gm-volt.com/members/1209u314_admin.285164/

10. Lloyd-Miller J.  Bob Lutz: Chevrolet Volt Should Have Been a Truck.  MotorBiscuit 1/13/14. https://www.motorbiscuit.com/bob-lutz-chevrolet-volt-should-have-been-a-truck/

11. Turner W.  What is the Difference Between Chevy Bolt and Volt?  FOURWHEEL TRENDS 10/5/21.  https://fourwheeltrends.com/what-is-the-difference-between-chevy-bolt-and-volt/

12. Chevrolet.  Bolt EV and Bolt EUV RECALL INFORMATION.  12/21/21. 

13. Chevrolet. All-Electric 2022 BOLT EUV.  https://www.chevrolet.com/electric/bolt-euv

14. Chevrolet.  Home charging.  https://www.chevrolet.com/electric/living-electric/home-charging

15. Electric vehicle database.  Tesla Model Y Performance.  https://ev-database.org/car/1183/Tesla-Model-Y-Performance

16. Tesla.  Semi.  The future of trucking. https://www.tesla.com/semi

17. Nedelea A.  Tesla Semi Order Books Open, Reserve One For $20,000.  INSIDEEVs 5/16/22.  https://insideevs.com/news/586072/tesla-semi-order-books-open/

18. Lambert F.  Electric trucks like Tesla Semi will get up to $40,000 in incentives with new bill.  electrek 7/29/22.  https://electrek.co/2022/07/29/electric-trucks-tesla-semi-40000-incentives-new-bill/#:~:text=For%20example%2C%20Tesla%20lists%20the,dominate%20the%20trucking%20industry%20today.

19. Why The Tesla Semi Is The Future of Trucks.  Tech Vision. YouTube.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ael2nTAraXs

20. Jose A.  Watch: Electric Bus Fails to Climb Steep Hill, Passengers Forced to Jump Ship as It Begins Reversing.  The Western Journal 8/1/22.  https://www.westernjournal.com/watch-electric-bus-fails-climb-steep-hill-passengers-forced-jump-ship-begins-reversing/?ff_source=Email&ff_medium=WJBreaking&ff_campaign=breaking&ff_content=western-journal

21. AAA Automotive.  The True Cost of Electric Vehicles.  AAA Auto Repair https://www.aaa.com/autorepair/articles/true-cost-of-ev

22. Henry J.  Repairing An Electric Vehicle Could Cost More Than Gasoline Cars: A New Kind Of Sticker Shock.  Forbes 7/25/22.  https://www.forbes.com/sites/jimhenry/2022/07/25/repairing-an-electric-vehicle-could-cost-more-than-gasoline-cars-a-new-kind-of sticker-shock/?sh=1fc96dcf5eee

23. Landymore F.  FAMILY ANNOYED WHEN    REPLACEMENT BATTERIES COST MORE THAN ELECTRIC CAR.  THE DARK SIDE OF ELECTRIC CARS.  The Byte 7/19/22.  https://futurism.com/the-byte/family-annoyed-battery-costs-more-electric-car

24. Chang S.  EV Nightmares: Tesla Owners Furious at Service Centers – Dead Mouse, Rat Poison Reported in Trunk After Visit.  The Western Journal 9/1/22 https://www.westernjournal.com/ev-nightmares-tesla-owners-furious-service-centers-dead-mouse-rat-poison-reported-trunk-visit/?utm_source=Email&utm_medium=newsletter-WJ&utm_campaign=dailyam&utm_content=western-journal&ats_es=d937b441d27be285460151f72946f5e9

25. Kay G.  A 19-year-old security researcher describes how he remotely hacked into over 25 Teslas.  Business Insider 1/25/22.  https://www.businessinsider.com/teen-security-researcher-describes-how-he-hacked-into-25-teslas-2022-1

26. TESLA.  Insurance. https://www.tesla.com/insurance

27. Jose A.  Electric Jaguar I-Pace Catches Fire While Charging, Reduced to Ashes in Middle of Road.  The Western Journal 8/2/22.  https://www.westernjournal.com/electric-jaguar-pace-catches-fire-charging-reduced-ashes-middle-road/?utm_source=Email&utm_medium=WJBreaking&utm_campaign=breaking&utm_content=western-journal&ats_es=d937b441d27be285460151f72946f5e9

28. Lee E.  How Many Electric Cars Catch Fire Every Year.  Electric Ride Lab 4/4/22 https://www.electricridelab.com/electric-cars-catch-fire/

29. Gutlin JM.  PLEASE JUST F&*(ING WORK? PLEASE? — Electric cars are doomed if fast charger reliability doesn’t get better. Ars Technica 7/13/22.  https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/07/electric-cars-are-doomed-if-fast-charger-reliability-doesnt-get-better/

30. Carbone C.  How will we charge them all? US needs to spend $35 BILLION to meet demand for 1.2 million public ports by 2030 (And that’s not counting the 28M needed in homes!).  Daily Mail Online 8/30/22.  https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-11157341/US-needs-build-478-EV-charging-ports-DAY-eight-years-cost-35BN-meet-demand.html\

31. Wolfe R.  I Rented an Electric Car for a Four-Day Road Trip. I Spent More Time Charging It Than I Did Sleeping.  Wall Street Journal 6/3/22. https://www.wsj.com/articles/i-rented-an-electric-car-for-a-four-day-road-trip-i-spent-more-time-charging-it-than-i-did-sleeping-11654268401?AID=11557093&PID=6415797&SID=bi%7C629e2712601ab110760eae7a%7C1655952505699fggt7f7k&subid=Business+Insider&cjevent=d155a100f2b111ec813d004b0a1c0e0b&tier_1=affiliate&tier_2=moa&tier_3=Business+Insider&tier_4=3861930&tier_5=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.wsj.com%2Farticles%2Fi-rented-an-electric-car-for-a-four-day-road-trip-i-spent-more-time-charging-it-than-i-did-sleeping-11654268401

32. O’Connell JO.  To No One’s Surprise, a Gas-Powered Road Trip Bests One in an Electric Vehicle. Red State 6/23/22.  https://redstate.com/jenniferoo.2022/06/23/to-no-ones-surprise-a-gas-powered-road-trip-beats-one -in-an-electric-vehicle-n582929

33. Lambert F.  Average electric car price hit $66,000 in the US, but that’s not the whole story.  Elektrek 7/25/22.  https://electrek.co/2022/07/25/average-electric-car-price-hit-66000-us-whole-story/

34. Rosevear J.  Cash is king for EV makers as soaring battery prices drive up vehicle production costs.  CNBC.  8/28/22.  https://www.cnbc.com/2022/08/28/ev-makers-face-cash-squeeze-amid-soaring-battery-production-costs.html

35. U.S. Department of Energy.  Office of ENERGY EFFICIENCY & RENEWABLE ENERGY. Federal Tax Credits for New All-Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles.  www.fueleconomy.govhttps://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/taxevb.shtml

36. California CLEAN VEHICLE REBATE PROGRAM.  https://cleanvehiclerebate.org/en

37. Lopez N.  Can Californians afford electric cars? Wait lists for rebates are long and some programs have shut down.  Cal Matters 8/2/22.   https://calmatters.org/environment/2022/08/california-electric-cars-rebates/ 

38. Newburger E.  California bans the sale of new gas-powered cars by 2035.  CNBC 8/25/22.  https://www.cnbc.com/2022/08/25/california-bans-the-sale-of-new-gas-powered-cars-by-2035.html

39. Spredemann A.  Experts Say Biden’s Expanded Lithium Production as Bad for Environment as Fossil Fuels. The Epoch Times 8/19/22.  https://www.theepochtimes.com/experts-say-bidens-expanded-lithium-production-as-bad-for-environment-as-fossil-fuels_4673186.html?utm_source=Morningbrief&%E2%80%A6%20%201/6.

40. Harper, G., Sommerville, R., Kendrick, E. et al. Recycling lithium-ion batteries from electric vehicles. Nature 575, 75–86 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-019-1682-5.  

41. Lopez N.  Electric car mandate: California air board questions cost, practicality.  Cal Matters 6/9/22 https://calmatters.org/environment/2022/06/electric-car-mandate-california/

42. Phillips J.  California Extends ‘Flex Alert,’ Warns Drivers Not to Charge Electric Cars. Epoch Times 9/4/22.  https://www.theepochtimes.com/california-extends-flex-alert-warns-drivers-not-to-charge-electric-cars_4709991.html?utm_source=News&utm_campaign=breaking-2022-09-05-1&utm_medium=email&est=AvniyYomWg4lyNbDFE0wZc36xQQyk5q4cuxYG6Cci%2BK7WikAWjSUqfn%2B1lI6Gj0%3D

43. Queen C.  Elon Musk Says That Civilization ‘Will Crumble’ If We Transition From Oil and Gas Too Quickly.  PJ Media 8/29/22.  https://pjmedia.com/news-and-politics/chris-queen/2022/08/29/elon-musk-says-that-civilization-will-crumble-if-we-transition-from-oil-and-gas-too-quickly-n1624920

44. Skinner A.  California Wildfires, Blackout Fears Create Conflict for Electric Car Users.   Newsweek 9/6/22.  https://www.msn.com/en-us/weather/topstories/california-wildfires-blackout-fears-create-conflict-for-electric-car-users/ar-AA11wDUx

45. Electric cars are good for something: Texas doctor uses a Rivian to power a vasectomy when the lights go out.  NottheBee.com 9/8/22.  https://notthebee.com/article/electric-cars-are-good-for-something-at-least-texas-doctor-uses-a-rivian-to-power-a-procedure-when-the-lights-go-out

46. South Park S10 E02 Smug Alert.  YouTube.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AnFAAdOBB1c

47. Pritchard C.  Can’t make it up: This DC tourist’s electric car died in West Virginia, so coal miners pushed it all the way to their coal mine to get it a charge.  NottheBee.com 9/6/22.  https://notthebee.com/article/dc-tourists-electric-car-dies-in-west-virginia-good-samaritan-coal-miners-push-it-all-the-way-to-their-coal-mine-to-get-it-a-charge

48. I&I Editorial Board.  California’s Net-Zero Energy Model Is Already A Disaster — So Why Should The Rest Of The U.S. Copy It?  Issues & Insights 9/9/22.  https://issuesinsights.com/2022/09/09/californias-net-zero-energy-model-is-already-a-disaster-so-why-would-the-rest-of-the-u-s-copy-it/

a poke in the (Buck) eye

Among the items awaiting me in my mailbox upon returning from Phuket was the KingSize catalogue my USPS daily digest warned me about a couple days ago.  I thought it might be a joke but there it was, in all its scarlet and gray glory. 

Was KingSize trying to shed the state of Michigan?  I’ve been a loyal KingSize customer since my gangly teen years when no one else could fit me, except at great expense, now still buying stuff from them like loose pants of all weights that are long enough.  As Americans have expanded, so have sources for big and tall stuff, but I keep going back to the originals.  So why did they do this to me?   I’m not one to complain to corporate, but somebody had to hear about this.  Hard to do on their web page, where your choices are an 800 number or an e-mail with a little box that won’t even take 100 words.  Fortunately, I found https://kingsize.pissedconsumer.com/customer-service.html, which gave their their corporate address in El Paso.  King Size is part of a 14 company conglomerate, so who knows who will read what I send.  See below what I sent their way.

KingSize used to be based in Indianapolis.  Maybe it they stayed there they’d have retained their BigTen sensibilities enough to know what that cover would do to a big chunk of their base.  Now they’re based in Texas, which means they’re Southern.  My Dixie-chick girlfriend Donna, now living in South Carolina, tells me they have a phrase for just such misguided behavior: “Bless their hearts”.

rock don’t cry

It wasn’t much like the crazy “rockabilly funeral” Commander Cody and his Lost Planet Airmen sang about (1), but the spirit inside the Hangar on the Hudson Sunday night was sure similar.  All were gathered for “A Celebration of the Art, Music, and Life” of Commander Cody, who ascended to the outer ozone late last September.  The events (2 to come) were the brainchild of Sue Casanova (wife of George Frayne, IV – a.k.a. Commander Cody), who on the day (9/26/21) she announced he’d died also announced:

“We are working on 2 big gatherings

On both the east and west coast

(The Island and the Bay Area)

To celebrate the Old Commander’s phenomenal life

And to benefit musicians in need.” 

Sunday night in Troy NY, 3 of the 5 remaining Lost Planet Airmen – Bill Kirchen, John Tichy, and Andy Stein – were joined by Dr. Tichy’s son Grant on steel, two other young locals, and the Commander’s longtime drummer Steve Barbuto to help consummate the first of these at last. 200 hippies crowded into the place were treated to more than 3 hours of good old Cody music, with leader Kirchen deftly deflecting shouted requests for Cody songs from the modern era (anything after the group’s ’76 breakup).  Of course, all in the audience loved CC&LPA, knew all their songs by heart, and happily shared stories about and pictures of their encounters with the Commander and his group over the past 50 plus years.  Sue put up some of her husband’s original paintings and included on the merch table materials about a Foundation she had helped set up- Swan Songs (2) – in his name to help out musicians who were in need.  Sue was sweet, sharp, funny, and handsome, “A high-bred, uptown, fancy little dame”, just like the Commander used to sing about (3).  I’d been corresponding with her regarding permission to use several pictures out of her husband’s art book (4) in the expanded 2nd edition of my own book on all my fun years with the Commander and his boys, first edition out since last May (5).  That and having seen her smiling face on her husband’s web page over the years made it all that more fun to finally meet her in person.

We reached no agreement on the permissions, but I’m sure that’ll come.

As Carly Simon sang in her hit the same year I first saw CC&LPA (6) “We can never know about the days to come.  But we think about them anyway” and in that thinking can come much enjoyment, even if the thing anticipated never actually comes to pass.  I think that’s why folks like me so enjoy making travel plans, savoring the trip to be taken long before we embark.  Sue was the one driving the bus for most of the trip that led to Sunday night’s celebration.  She gave it a start with her announcement on George’s Facebook page the day he died. Just the thought of hanging out with others who loved him like I did took some of the sting out of his loss right there.  Sue had her slow hand on that bus for many months until 3 Saturdays before the first celebration.  Her announcing e-mail came with an attached poster, which I of course took to Kinko’s to be blown up and framed.

Boy did that sound like a party!  I had my arrangements made before lunch and would have had them done faster had I not waited for my wife to wake up, silly in retrospect given her enthusiastic assent.  I should have known, since I’ve turned her into almost as big a CC&LPA fan as I am, especially of Kirchen.  Then it was just waiting, the hardest part, as the much-missed Tom Petty sang (7).

Come the Saturday before the Celebration, all went smoothly.  DTW-ALB is an easy flight to a nice small airport just a few miles from our AirBnB a half mile from the venue.  Our late afternoon arrival gave time for a little reccie up River Avenue to check out the Hangar (8).  Conveniently across the street is the Ale House (9), an old honest neighborhood bar with a good beer selection populated that evening with locals and Cody fans with much overlap.  Next to us at the bar was the proprietor of the Hangar, who told us the place used to manufacture orthotics and prosthetics, a past remembered by the artificial legs on the bar serving as the bartenders’ tip jars.  The place has a reputation as one of the funkiest venues in the northeast (10).   The Commander had played there frequently, making the 35-mile drive down I-87 from Saratoga Springs, where he’d lived since 1998.  Dr. John Tichy didn’t moonlight much from his post as Professor and onetime Department Chair of Nuclear and Aerospace Engineering at Rensselaer Polytech in Troy (11), but the Hangar was his favored place to play, as it was for his son Graham.  We were told the place held about 200 with limited seating (but efficient beverage service), would be hot inside despite AC, and that we should get there before doors if we wanted to sit (we did).

Going across the street to take a gander, it was a low cement block industrial building, looking like any of the many machine shops in Warren Michigan.

The sunflowers were nice, but plants grow around abandoned buildings all the time.  We went home vowing to come back plenty early, killing time in the Ale House till we could start up to get in.

The next day, a nap after a 4-mimosa brunch put us back from our planned 3:30 start.  The Ale House was crowded when we went there at 4.  Doors were to be at 5, so my wife jumped across the street before she had a sip of her beer. I stayed behind to eat both our chowders and secure go-cups from the waitress.  We wiled away some time in line with our new West Virginia friends Steve and George, and were finally let into the sanctum just a little late.  Will call was on computer and we were tagged and in.  We snagged 2 seats right by the stage, already set up.

We could figure from the instruments who would be where.  In the corner by us with the fiddle and the tenor sax would be Android E. Stein of NYC.  That big guitar in the middle was obviously a Telecaster, waiting for the Titan Kirchen (12).  A nondescript guitar in the far corner would be Dr. Tichy’s.  We didn’t know who would man the keyboard in the far back, with the unenviable task of emulating the Commander’s tinklings (it would be local Mike Kelley, who would do fine).  Original Airman Buffalo Bruce Barlow was supposed to come to play bass, so that horribly beat up stand up with the Cubs sticker on the back would be his?  Turns out he had to stay in California for a family emergency, so local Mo Nelson (with Chicago roots) would play it.  He also would prove to be a gifted crooner.  Finally, that critical instrument for any country band, the steel guitar, stood waiting for its practitioner.  CC&LPA had 3 excellent lap steel guitarists during their time (Creeper/Black/Hagar).  Tonight, they’d had to resort to nepotism, asking Dr. Tichy’s son Graham to man it.  Graham corrected me that it was only a lap steel, not a pedal steel.   Regardless, he, and it, would sound fine throughout.  Dr. Tichy snuck out and slipped playlists at 3 critical positions. I teased him “Is that sheet music, Professor?”

Finally, shortly after 6, the boys appeared.  Having seen them all in Novato last October, I wasn’t shocked at their appearance.  Stein, trim and smiling in his Hawaiian shirt with his curly hair, looked youngest.  I’ve seen Bill so much over the years, seeing him get wizened and a little bent over gradually.  I used to think he and I looked kinda alike, but I‘m wizened and bent over these days too.  If only I had Bill’s energy (and talent!).  Professor Tichy looked every bit the part, mostly sitting with his half glasses sliding halfway down his nose.  He confessed later to being a “half-nerd”, thanking the Commander and his music for saving him from what could have been.  Getting his U of M PhD and a post at Rensselaer within a year of CC&LPA’s breakup, with a subsequent stellar academic career (11), I’d say he got the best of both worlds. Graham is the spitting image of his dad, maybe a little stockier, so you couldn’t help but look up at them and say “Hey, CC&LPA have nerd bookends!”

As they opened with “Gypsy Fiddle”, a Stein showpiece (13),  I should have asked my wife to pinch me.  But they rolled through two Cody sets fitting for any of the many I’ve reveled in over the past 51 plus years.  I was hoping someone would have put the show up on setlist.fm.  You could see there what they played and clicked on examples.  Maybe someone will still do it.   After the show, I told Kirchen this was the best Cody concert I’d heard since they came to the Ark in Ann Arbor for 2 raucous nights in January 2001 as part of their “Not Dead Yet” tour.  I’ll not get into specifics.  Maybe you had to be there.  Too bad you couldn’t be.  But I will tell you how they finished. (14). And that’s where we all were, every last one of us.  I hope to return sometime soon.

references

1.Commander Cody And His Lost Planet Airmen – Rockabilly Funeral (live). YouTube.,
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cju1ngsxYZU

2. for more information, contact Christine Albert, Founder and CEO, Swan Songs, christine@swansongs.org, cell: 512-656-1492. P.O.Box 41475, Austin TX 78704

3.Commander Cody And His Lost Planet Airmen. Smoke! Smoke! Smoke! (That Cigarette) (Live). YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iawlT3HHW0

4, Commander Cody aka George Frayne. Art, Music, & Life. Ridgewood, NJ: QBookPres, 2009. https://www.amazon.com/s?k=art%2C+music+and+life+george+frayne&crid=3I1V0CG1HLLIK&sprefix=george+Frayne%2Caps%2C126&ref=nb_sb_ss_ts-doa-p_2_13

5. Ike B. Lost in the Ozone…Again! The Commander, his Boys, and Me. 50 years and Counting. Amazon (Kindle) 2021. Available at https://www.amazon.com/Lost-Ozone-Again-Commander-counting-ebook/dp/B096KY4Z4D/ref=sr_1_3?dchild=1&keywords=Bob+Ike&qid=1624277207&sr=8-3

6. Carly Simon. Anticipation. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BELWbkyOVPQ

7. Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers – The Waiting (Official Music Video). YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uMyCa35_mOg

8. The Hangar on the Hudson. https://www.thehangaronthehudson.com/
Ale House. https://www.alehousetroy.com/

9. Ale House. https://www.alehousetroy.com/

10. Don Wilcock. THE HANGAR ON THE HUDSON — A UNIQUE EXPERIENCE. NIPPERTOWN8/18/21. HTTPS://NIPPERTOWN.COM/2021/08/18/THE-HANGAR-ON-THE-HUDSON-A-UNIQUE-EXPERIENCE/

11. John A. Tichy. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Faculty Directory. https://faculty.rpi.edu/node/36055

12. Jim Caliguiri. Titan of the Telecaster Bill Kirchen. The Austin Chronicle 8/26/16. https://www.austinchronicle.com/music/2016-08-26/titan-of-the-telecaster-bill-kirchen/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fLDaXw_XLxY

13. Commander Cody – Gypsy Fiddle.wmv. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fLDaXw_XLxY

14. Commander Cody and his Lost Planet Airmen. Lost in the ozone again. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KHIRCOPas-M

%d bloggers like this: